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gavpedz
Hi all i am Gavin and am hunting for some info and maybe a puppy

We are looking for a pup which would be small/medium when adult.
We are in Cornwall and still need to see if our landlady would allow it.

We are a family of four my wife and i, two children aged 3 and 8. The 8 year old has Autism and is a little unsure of big dogs but seems fine with cats etc so we feel getting a pup and allowing them to grow together will help him greatly.

On approval of the landlady we would be looking for a gentle friendly dog that is good with kids and a busy household. Pref a bitch as i have been told they can be gentler than males (correct me if wrong)

We both work but we work alternate shifts so someone is home everyday all day.

Pref house trained but not essential, must be a fairly easily maintained dog i.e coat exercise etc...

We are fairly active and go out on walks with the kids often so there will be plenty of walkie's

Some breeds we have been interested in are beagles, terriers (non scruffy ones if there is such), staffs but i prefer ones that do not have such wide heads i am not sure is this is a gender thing or breed thing but some pics i see they look quite sweet where as others look like thugs lol

Also out of interest as i am new here what are the cost of taking on a pup as in how much are they is there a set price or is it free to good home type thing? just interested as i have looked at buying but shelling out 700 plus in one go is a lot.
Well i think thats about it.
Thanks Gavin
Scoots
Hello Gavin! Welcome to Dogpages smile.gif

I've split your post off from the other thread so you get your own welcome thread. You may also want to post in the Chatter section re homing a dog but I think people will advise you to get your landlady's permission before making serious enquiries smile.gif
Tigger27
wave.gif Hello and Welcome to DP wave.gif

QUOTE(gavpedz @ 17th Mar 2009, 9:13 pm) *

Also out of interest as i am new here what are the cost of taking on a pup as in how much are they is there a set price or is it free to good home type thing? just interested as i have looked at buying but shelling out 700 plus in one go is a lot.
Well i think thats about it.
Thanks Gavin


If you think about getting a puppy from a rescue(which is what this forum is all about smile.gif ) then there is usually a set donation that the rescue will ask for to help with the cost of vaccinating/microchipping/neutering the dog and also helps with the costs for the other dogs the rescues get in. smile.gif
Good luck in your search for a new addition to the family, I hope the landlady agrees to let you keep a dog smile.gif
gavpedz
Thanks guys i hope so two i think a dog would be a great addition to the family we will see.
Bevd
Welcome!
WOODCHIP
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glenyskent
Welcome Gavin
Dogpages
Hi Gavin, good luck with your search for the right dog.

Parents often think that a puppy would be the best choice for a family with young children but that isn't always the case.

Puppies have sharp teeth and very little 'bite inhibition' which only develops as they get older. Puppies aren't house-trained and training may take many months before the dog is totally reliable. Having children falling into puppy puddles or walking it through the house isn't ideal.

Puppies don't mature for at least a year, bigger breeds longer. Good training throughout is essential. It's hard to persuade children to hide their socks and shoes away so they can't be chewed by the puppy and having their favourite toys or clothes destroyed can try their patience no matter how much they love their puppy. To puppies, everything is a chew-toy.

It's difficult to judge the temperament a young puppy will have as an adult and there will be extra costs. Spaying will typically cost around 150 ranging to over 200 for a large dog. Neutering is especially important where there are young children who can't be relied upon to keep doors and gates closed. Puppies need two inoculations in the first three months.

If you were able to adopt a grown dog from a good rescue who are able to reliably assess the temperament of their dogs it would normally be already neutered by them. A maturing dog passes through many stages and can be a major handful around the one year mark, much like a stroppy human teenager. The temperament of dog past the age of about 18 months is that of the adult dog - so what you see is what you will get.

The best first step might be to get to look round a few local rescues to get a better idea of what you need. It's a big decision so take your time, your new dog is likely to depend on you for the next 15 years.
Jazzlet
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cammyboo
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gavpedz
QUOTE(Dogpages @ 17th Mar 2009, 11:19 pm) *

Hi Gavin, good luck with your search for the right dog.

Parents often think that a puppy would be the best choice for a family with young children but that isn't always the case.

Puppies have sharp teeth and very little 'bite inhibition' which only develops as they get older. Puppies aren't house-trained and training may take many months before the dog is totally reliable. Having children falling into puppy puddles or walking it through the house isn't ideal.

Puppies don't mature for at least a year, bigger breeds longer. Good training throughout is essential. It's hard to persuade children to hide their socks and shoes away so they can't be chewed by the puppy and having their favourite toys or clothes destroyed can try their patience no matter how much they love their puppy. To puppies, everything is a chew-toy.

It's difficult to judge the temperament a young puppy will have as an adult and there will be extra costs. Spaying will typically cost around 150 ranging to over 200 for a large dog. Neutering is especially important where there are young children who can't be relied upon to keep doors and gates closed. Puppies need two inoculations in the first three months.

If you were able to adopt a grown dog from a good rescue who are able to reliably assess the temperament of their dogs it would normally be already neutered by them. A maturing dog passes through many stages and can be a major handful around the one year mark, much like a stroppy human teenager. The temperament of dog past the age of about 18 months is that of the adult dog - so what you see is what you will get.

The best first step might be to get to look round a few local rescues to get a better idea of what you need. It's a big decision so take your time, your new dog is likely to depend on you for the next 15 years.


Thanks yes i do see what you mean totally and ideally an adult dog would be better but as stated our son is Autistic and is not overly sure about big dogs/adult dogs so our thought was getting a small puppy would be more manageable for him and as they grow together he will get used to it if we just got a adult dog he would be likely to freak and make his uncertainty worse
becks1983
QUOTE(Dogpages @ 17th Mar 2009, 11:19 pm) *

Hi Gavin, good luck with your search for the right dog.

Parents often think that a puppy would be the best choice for a family with young children but that isn't always the case.

Puppies have sharp teeth and very little 'bite inhibition' which only develops as they get older. Puppies aren't house-trained and training may take many months before the dog is totally reliable. Having children falling into puppy puddles or walking it through the house isn't ideal.



Its not easy!! I had 2 puppies on foster here AND my daughter 14 months old toddling about, there teeth are VERY sharp it not pleasent when they hang off your ankle! rolleyes.gif lol.gif And little puddles along with the rush to pick up the parcel because one is doing it, one is eating it the child wants to investigate!! rolleyes.gif (Yes my house is slightly mad!!)

I wish yoe all the best in your search for your dog, maybe spend some time with a puppy if you can may help!

Oh and wave.gif Welcome to DP
filly
I'm quite new too, but hello and welcome!

QUOTE(gavpedz @ 18th Mar 2009, 2:49 pm) *

Thanks yes i do see what you mean totally and ideally an adult dog would be better but as stated our son is Autistic and is not overly sure about big dogs/adult dogs so our thought was getting a small puppy would be more manageable for him and as they grow together he will get used to it if we just got a adult dog he would be likely to freak and make his uncertainty worse



My friend's son has recently been diagnosed with ASD and just loves animals, so I was reading this with interest. I hadn't thought about them growing together. I'd wondered if an adult dog would be better, as they would fit more easily into your existing routine, rather than a puppy which needed to have everything adapted to their needs (and whose needs would keep changing until it reached adulthood). I can see why a small, steady dog might be less challenging, especially if your family could get to know it gradually before it moved in.

I've never had children or puppies, so please ignore me if I'm talking rubbish!
gavpedz
Yes it is just an adult dog would most likely make josh freak thus ruining our chances of getting a dog forever.

It is a sort of this is our one chance type thing if it does not go right then that will be it forever josh will not forget and there will be no second chances.

Josh would most likely not pay to much attention to a puppy and would probably accept it ok and as they both grow together josh would be more likely to accept the dog as part of the family. An adult dog would just not be a good move for our circumstances. I do see what you guys mean and if it were not for josh we prob would get a adult as it is so much less hassle there would be no early vaccinations accidents etc etc but this is just they way it has to be. smile.gif
pbr
Hi
when you say an adult dog would freak your son do you think it is the size that would or the fact that it is just not a baby? I say this because maybe he might be ok with an adult small breed dog? some can look like puppies to be honest! I know cairns and westies often look lioke puppies when clipped short. Have you maybe thought about an adult small breed like that?
gavpedz
Well yes we would like a smaller bread anyway for above reasons but just feel starting at baby would be best.


For example we made the decision 3 years ago to have another baby Isabel) we did not know how Josh would react but went for it anyway.

He was not overly impressed at this when arriving home to find a baby there but accepted it. Isabel is now 3 and pesters and drags josh around but he just about accepts it but if we just introduced Isablel to Josh at the age of three walking talking tantrums and all he would not have coped it is due to the gradual getting used to her and watching here grow that has helped him accept Isabel and they now get on ok.

I feel it is going to be a similar principle here but i could be wrong i do think in one way an adult would be better as it is less likely to be so hyper etc which may not go down to well but at the same time we have one chance and if that freaks him there is no (o well we will just get a puppy then because he will remember and will never accept a dog puppy or adult)

It is a hard enough decision to get a dog anyway but with our situation it is so much harder it may be that a small breed adult would be ok i am just not sure.
pbr
Have you tried him with different dogs? Maybe you could try volunteering at a rescue to do dog walking and take your son along? They often have puppies that need socialising and maybe he could get exposure to various breeds old and young and you could see what he was like with them before committing to a permanent dog?
Alternatively maybe consider fostering an older dog to see how it goes? Obviously you also have to consider the dog and whether your situation is right for him/her as well as the impact on your son.

I do think if he has not had any exposure to dogs or very limited exposure that you should maybe try a few "temporary" things first as it would be heartbreaking for all concerned to permanently home a dog and it not work out.
Just a thought..
gavpedz
Yes thank you good suggestion i will look in to that.
Greyeyes
QUOTE(gavpedz @ 19th Mar 2009, 1:06 pm) *


I feel it is going to be a similar principle here but i could be wrong


I see what you mean about a similar principle .. but .. you wouldn't be bringing home a *newborn* pup, which very gradually starts moving about on its own, walking, playing, and so on over a matter of weeks or months. It would already be 8/10 weeks old, very lively and bouncy and unpredictable. Rather like a boingy human toddler, in other words.



xLynnex
Hi Gavin, welcome to DP.

I am no expert, when it comes to dogs, I can only pull on my own experiences of owning dogs throughout my life. I have two small terriers, one is aged 4 the other almost 3. Terriers are quite liveley dogs and very energetic. I have two small grandchildren who come to stay every other weekend my dogs behaviour changes around my granchildren, ie they are a lot calmer and more considerate of them(normally they are complete nutters lol.gif ) I think adult dog are more susceptible (sp) to their surroundings and are able to control themselves to suit, obvioulsy if trained correctly. Whereas a puppy, well they are toddlers on blue smarties, permanenet whirlwinds.

Good luck, whatever you choose
redkay75
Hi Gavin,
Welcome to the Dog pages and good luck with the new addition getting a dog was the best thing my husband and I have ever done!

I teach in a special school for pupils with ASD and specialise in middle to lower end of the scale, particularily pupils with serious communication difficulties, who are either entirely non-verbal or very limited in verbal commuication.

I have recently become very interested in the role that dogs can have as therapy for people with Autism after noticing how much more relaxed I am after suffering from a very stressful period in my life with the help of my dog Scruff. The kids in my class mostly are either ambivilant or scared of dogs but I had started to take long walks with them around a local lake where everyone walks their dogs. We have slowly introduced dogs by approaching almost every one that comes our way (with owners permission and guidance obviously) and I always carry dog treats in my pockets to help this. Even the most scared of the kids just by watching how relaxed and happy I am with the dogs of all shapes and sizes is starting to show some real interest and the others who were ambivilant will come with me to the dogs and feed them treats and stroke them. I must say this wouldn't be possible without the understanding of the owners, as my kids are all 15 and 16 and the biggest and most scared boy is 5' 7'' and 22 stone, these aren't small boys.

I recently read the book 'a friend like Henry' and was so moved I wish to start dog therapy at the school but know it will take some time to set up, but when you start hunting for other stories about how buying a puppy has helped some Autistic children overcome so many hurdles as they have more empathy for the dog. For example the need to eat, by feeding the dog they learn how important it is to eat, by bathing a dirty dog they learn about hygiene, cutting claws and grooming helps them learn about clothes and how we look, vets about doctors and dentists, the list is endless! tongue.gif

I can't say how much I wish you all the luck in the world!

some links showing the benefit,

scientific study - http://www.researchautism.net/intervention...amp;infolevel=3

the web site - http://www.support-dogs.org.uk/AADogs.htm

The story of Dale and Henry -http://women.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/women/families/article2158165.ece

Does what it says on the tin - http://www.helium.com/items/1350833-how-a-...ids-with-autism


Please let us know how you get on and all my best with the journey, you will fall in love I guarentee that!

oh my must also say dogs are very funny creatures and it is about getting the right dog for your family, puppy or grown dog they must be right for you and it is a lot of work whether you get a puppy or a grown dog as mine at 2 1/2 years old came to me with a lot of issues, but it's worth when you get the right one for your family. Happy hunting!

K
hectorsmum
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nicky H
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