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Tia2
Went for a walk with my friend and her pup today and she has been warned by her trainer that 3 dogs in our area have recently been diagnosed with lungworm which can be fatal if not treated and not all wormers prevent it - I dont think Drontal does - which is the wormer I use, so I'll be calling the vets tomorrow for the low-down!!

Have any of you heard that it is on the increase - apparently dogs can get it from licking infected slugs/snails or eating them, or of course from infected animals - including foxes - Tia's fav trick is to roll in fox poo. rolleyes.gif

I think Panacur protects against it - as does I think Advantage......

Any more info on this would be great?! And for those of you like me who didnt realise it was something to be worried about (as I didnt think it was rife in UK) - heres a heads up!

ETA - just done a google search and some sites are saying Lungworm and some saying Heartworm - both saying that its not common in UK - why cant there just be one site for all this sort of stuff!!!!!
Endangered Dogs Defence Rescue
one of our rescue dogs has been diagnosed with lungworm sad.gif

she had a small cut to her front paw, it wouldn't stop bleeding, then she had a tiny cut to her muzzle the size of a pin prick and for days we couldn't stop the bleeding, vets carried out blood tests etc, stool sample over three days confirmed lungworm, she had eaten a slug several weeks prior


we are using Advocate, it will treat lungworm specifically as well as other parasites, but you have to be extra careful when treating collie or collie crosses-speak to your vet about it

a friend of mine in herts lost her dog recently, PM couldn't confirm lungworm but it is highly suspected as being the cause of death, the probelm is that by the time symptoms show and it is actually detected, which is difficult as there are a wide range of signs which could easily be overlooked as being due to something else, it can be too late

Amanda
jennie_71
I posted about this on another similar DP thread, but will just mention my experience again. About 3 weeks ago we adopted a 9 yr old lurcher from Dogs Trust (Monty). After a few days of settling in, I noticed that he was panting/gasping a lot and sleeping far more than even a lurcher should. Took him to the vets for a check up, and after all sorts of tests and x rays, vets now suspect a long-standing lungworm infection. His lungs are scarred and calcifying, and he has an enlarged heart. The heart damage is a result of the infestation/lung damage and he is in the early stages of heart failure and on all sorts of meds now err.gif Anyway, he was also given a 7 day course of Panacur to kill any remaining larvae/worms.
As Amanda said in her post, unfortunately once it has been detected it may be too late - the damage is already done sad.gif I'm sad that generally there seems to be so little awareness of it - and the information available is confusing. It is often referred to as French Heartworm.
Endangered Dogs Defence Rescue
QUOTE(jennie_71 @ 21st Aug 2008, 12:54 am) *

I posted about this on another similar DP thread, but will just mention my experience again. About 3 weeks ago we adopted a 9 yr old lurcher from Dogs Trust (Monty). After a few days of settling in, I noticed that he was panting/gasping a lot and sleeping far more than even a lurcher should. Took him to the vets for a check up, and after all sorts of tests and x rays, vets now suspect a long-standing lungworm infection. His lungs are scarred and calcifying, and he has an enlarged heart. The heart damage is a result of the infestation/lung damage and he is in the early stages of heart failure and on all sorts of meds now err.gif Anyway, he was also given a 7 day course of Panacur to kill any remaining larvae/worms.
As Amanda said in her post, unfortunately once it has been detected it may be too late - the damage is already done sad.gif I'm sad that generally there seems to be so little awareness of it - and the information available is confusing. It is often referred to as French Heartworm.



it's a difficult subject to understand, i've been googling for days, found the other topic in dogpages via google-all very helpful, i asked our vet about using a different wormer to advocate for one of our collie x but he said Panacur will reduce numbers but isn't guaranteed to eliminate, advocate is, but others have said Panacur will work, all adds to the overall confusion

big hug to your dog, mine started coughing, we praying she be okay

amanda x
PennyB
I know my vets now has posters up about it --- its quite prevalent in West Wales
stella123
My mum has posted about this recently as she very suddenly lost her healthy much loved dog to it a few weeks ago. She is in the Swansea Valley area and the problem is rife up there.

Link 1
Link 2

It is a subject she has researched in depth.

I spoke to my vet on the weekend and have put both my dogs on Advocate as this is a prevention. By the time they knew what had caused the problem with Doofy it was too late. Drontal does not cover it and Pancuar can treat it I think but will offer no protection.

It can be caught and transmitted so easily.
ck2
Sorry for asking stupid questions:

What is Lungworm?
How do one gets infected?
What are the signs?
What cures it?
Someone mentioned Advocate works on that as well. I have Advocate spot on, would that do?
Many thanks.
BC Rescue
I will try to answer your questions with my knowledge of this worm ..


What is Lungworm?
Basically it is a worm that infects the lungs and can also travel

How do one gets infected?
Some (not all) slugs and snails carry the worm, dogs either eat slug/snail OR drink water with those tiny water snails in it .. so still water in your garden, out on walks, ponds, water tanks etc all could potentially be a threat to your dog. Also very tiny snails could possibly be on grass that dogs seem to enjoy munching .. so very difficult to control your dog not having contact in some way with this problem.


What are the signs?
Coughing (often like Kennel Cough), excessive panting, wheezing.


What cures it?
Advocate and Panacur. As far as I know there is no 'preventative' just the wormers will sort it if treated when the infestation takes place. BUT collie owners should be very aware that ANY wormer containing Invermetic could be potentially leathal for your dog. There is a MDR1 test that can be done on your dog ot see if it can tolerate such drugs. If you have collies, its always worth getting the test done for peace of mind.


One of my dogs had lungworm years and years ago (she was fine after a double dose of panacur) ... its not a new thing, but does seem to be more common now.








stella123
I have copied this from a leaflet - please excuse any typos!

Lungworm is your dog at risk?

Lungworm is a life threatening disease and with cases being more widely reported its a problem that appears to be on the increase. The disease known as angiostronglyosis is caused by a type of lunchgworm that is becoming more widespread in the UK - the reason for this is unknown but could be a result of global warming. The lungworm used to be confined to South Wales, south west and some areas of the south east. However more recent cases have been diagnosed over a much wider area throughtout the uk and ireland.

How does my dog become infected

For dogs to become infected they have to eat infected larvae. These may be present in slugs, snails and sometimes in frogs too.

Some dogs may not eat slugs and snails on purpose but they may do so by accident - e.g. when a slug or snail is sitting on a bone or favourite toy. In fact research has shown that infected lungworm can also be released from the slug or snail (in the slimy trail they leave behind). So larvae could potentially be found wherever slugs or snails have left their trails such as puddles and outdoor driunking water.

What are the symptoms

when this lungworm gets inside a dog it can result in a number of quite different symptoms, some of which are easily confused with other illnesses. Your dog could present with one of the following symptoms if infected.
1. Breathing problems or coughing, tiring more easily
2. Poor blood clotting leading to excessive bleeding from minor wounds, nose bleeds, bleeding into the eye and anaemia (paleness around eyes and gums)
3. Behavioural changes, seizures, spinal pain, weight loss, loss of appetite, vomitting and diarrheoa

Younger dogs up to 2 years are more suceptible to lungworm infection - most likely due to their inquisitive nature. However any breed of any age can be at risk

Treating lungworm
If angiostronglyosis is suspected your vet can prescribe your dog an innovative, monthly applied spot on treatment. This will effectively kill the lungworm responsible for the disease as well as treat a wide range of other parasites such as fleas, roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, heartworm, mites and biting lice.
Lucyandmeg
THe first case we had of it recently was a cocker spaniel that had a brain bleed because of it. She was treated with advocate spot on because she had a paralysis of the throat (caused by the worm) which would mean it could be fatal if something when wrong when trying to get her to swollow something. Panacur will treat it but it has to be given more often than just one treatment, similarly milbemax tablets will work, but only if dosed once a week for a month.
The posh name for lungworm/french heartworm is angiostrongylus vasorum
ck2
thanks.
jennie_71
QUOTE(Endangered Dogs Defence Rescue @ 21st Aug 2008, 1:13 am) *

it's a difficult subject to understand, i've been googling for days, found the other topic in dogpages via google-all very helpful, i asked our vet about using a different wormer to advocate for one of our collie x but he said Panacur will reduce numbers but isn't guaranteed to eliminate, advocate is, but others have said Panacur will work, all adds to the overall confusion

big hug to your dog, mine started coughing, we praying she be okay

amanda x


Thanks, Amanda - hugs to your girl, I hope she makes a full recovery. My boy coughs a lot too sad.gif

Just want to mention to everyone that fox are also a reservoir for the lungworm parasite, and it can be transmitted via their (fox) poo.
Tia2
Thanks guys - so worrying all this isnt it - especially as there does seem to be so much conflicting information, I will get some advocate to be sure, just not worth the risk is it.

I dont own a collie but why can they not have advocate or the like? What is it that only collies cannot cope with, and why??

Suprised to read of so many more cases aswell - I fear it may well be on the increase. sad.gif

I hope everyone's dog with lungworm all make a full speedy recovery. wub.gif
Lucyandmeg
Collies can be sensitive to ivermectin.
Tia2
ah thanks - is that all collies, or just border collies as my mate has a berdie - obviously she'll speak to her vet but I was just wondering! Why is it that they are sensitive but other dogs are ok?
Akitas
QUOTE(Tia2 @ 21st Aug 2008, 1:51 pm) *

Suprised to read of so many more cases aswell - I fear it may well be on the increase. sad.gif


I believe it's been on the increase in the south east for the past 2-3 years ..... I've also noticed a huge increase in the numbers of slugs and snails in the past 2-3 years in both my garden and the local fields. I've been wondering if there's anywhere we could rescue a hedgehog from (that maybe can't be released into the wild again) to help keep them down in the garden.

Pray for a cold, hard, long winter, and less rain .... that should help sort them out!
Lucyandmeg
QUOTE
ah thanks - is that all collies, or just border collies as my mate has a berdie - obviously she'll speak to her vet but I was just wondering! Why is it that they are sensitive but other dogs are ok?

I'm not sure why exactly, it must be something in their genetic make up. I believe its mainly roungh collies, but beardies and borders can also be a risk. My border collie has had it before without a problem.
pollysmum
In my understanding, the genetic defect in collies is one that means the blood brain barrier - that prevents toxic substances... in this case a 'helpful' drug from building up in the brain - is not as efficient as it 'should' be. It means some collies are super sensitive to this substance and a whole list more.

I have recently adopted a border collie rescue and was concerned about worming her... she's 'at risk' because she eats dirt, snails, grass, and would surely eat fox poo if she found it.

I found helpful advice somewhere on the net... might even have been here, sorry, can't remember, that you can get collies genetically tested for the defect. A cheek swab only required, and the lab were very very helpful. (And the test not prohibitively expensive) Obviously, I can't post the address and advertise but if anyone wants to know I would be glad to pass it on.

Fortunately, Polly is free of the problem, so Milbemax it is... vet advises monthly treatment for 3 months followed by 3 monthly treatment forever (I presume). Also fortunately, we are not a 'hotspot' here, but I am glad to be able to take sensible precautions and not worry I am building up a toxic dose of the substance in her already collie-crazy brain!

(Hope it is ok to have mentioned the specific wormer as it has been mentioned previously??)

Claire

(PS vet said it was ok in the first place - similar but not identical to ivermectin, but I am a worry wart and wanted to be sure!)
Inca's Mum
Is it Advocate that you can't use if you've got cats, or am I thinking of something else? unsure.gif

And if so - why, if you don't actually give it to the cats? dunno.gif
poverton
My vet told me last night about an increase in our area - but apparently Miblemax (sp?) treats it as well as the other types of worms. Just need to treat on a regular basis
Beardie Lover
We had an angiostronylus scare recently. Our dog Poppy was supposed to have a knee op but when the vet took fluid from the knee it had blood in it. He therefore postponed the op pending blood tests. This was because if she had got angiostrongylus he was afraid that he would have been unable to stop the bleeding and she would have bled to death on the operating table. Thank God the tests came back negative but she had been treated with a sachet of Panacur each day for seven days in any case.
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