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> Getting An Old Dog To Gain Weight?
agilitymad
post 6th Jul 2017, 11:27 am
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Hello not been on here for ages, i have an oes x whos nearly 14, i'm really struggling to get him to eat. He will lick his dinner and maybe eat a few mouthfulls, fed twice a day.

My vet said to feed puppy food, so feeding a high quality puppy food with added meat as wont eat just dry, mixed in. He like treats and human food. I'm wondering to go homecooked and fed more times a day? any suggestions greatly received smile.gif
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woofgang
post 6th Jul 2017, 11:42 am
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If hes an old dog then give him what he will eat, whatever it is.....excepting the no nos like chocolate and raisins.
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kayb
post 6th Jul 2017, 12:01 pm
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Agree with Woofgang. Other than anything poisonous, once mine are old I reckon I can't do much harm so just let them enjoy what they want. My 14 year old has just decided Morrisons own brand "meat" lumps with gravy is yummy. wacko.gif Not what I'd normally let her have but she's eating it and she was refusing the good stuff so that's what she gets.

Hope you can find something for your old boy to settle with. hug.gif
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Pixiedog
post 6th Jul 2017, 1:39 pm
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My old Goldie, who we lost just shy of his sixteenth birthday, ate Chappie and tinned rice pudding for the last few months of his life, also the odd digestive biscuit. Until then he had only had complete dried food, but I was very happy to let him have whatever he would eat.
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Annieskel
post 7th Jul 2017, 7:09 am
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I have always found that when dogs will only eat what they want there is a reason for it but us humans never find out the reason. Did your vet check his kidneys? One of my mother's dogs would only eat cooked lambs liver for the last 2 years of his life, we never worked out why. I had a dog that would only eat processed sliced ham, there are many reasons for this.

I would just give him what he wants, if we want chocolate we go and get some, he will be much happier getting what he wants.


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Penninepoodlewelfare
post 7th Jul 2017, 9:04 am
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My 11 y o prefers to eat his food off the kitchen floor rather than out of a dish ohmy.gif
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Lab Lady
post 7th Jul 2017, 7:01 pm
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Had similar problems with Jade last year, we found by accident that metronidazole helped a bit as she had awful teeth but far too old/wobbly for treatment (we adopted her aged 15).

Have you tried Country Hunter tinned foods? Jade would eat them sometimes but in the end she survived on beef burgers, chicken goujons and baked sweet potatoes ! Home cooking is probably the way to go, trial and error - as others have said, whatever he fancies. Good luck x
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mokee
post 7th Jul 2017, 8:33 pm
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I'd be inclined to go back to the vets and ask them to do some tests to find out why your dog is off their food. Dogs don't just stop eating for no reason, a blood test would show if there were some problem with kidney or liver damage, at the very least.

When one of my old girls went off her food the vet put her on mirtazipine, which is a human antidepressant but also an appetite stimulant.
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Barneyblue2
post 8th Jul 2017, 2:42 pm
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I'm sorry your old dog is feeling less inclined to eat, but it happens to us all in old age generally.
My OES used to like tripe with some dried kibble mixed in. She also loved steak and kidney bought raw from the butcher as human pie filling as an occasional treat.
More recently, my Goldie who I lost at Christmas aged 16 only wanted boiled rice and cooked (roast) chicken with the occasional tin of Chappie for the last few months. My vet said that he would be fine on this indefinitely.
I agree with others that you should probably forget all you know about the best nutrition etc. Your older dog doesn't have the same needs as a younger one and will probably choose whatever he likes best and I'd allow him.
If you feel that there is more to this than meets the eye, and he seems unwell then by all means, take him back to the vet for more tests, but if it is just a case of an old dog slowing down and no longer wanting food for growth and energy, then go with the flow. I always indulge my old dogs (within the realms of safe foods of course) wub.gif wub.gif wub.gif
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daftdog
post 8th Jul 2017, 2:51 pm
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Dont know if this may be of some help, I noticed my 13 year old Jack Russell wasnt eating so much, was leaving food in her bowl, I put her bowl on a shoe box, her head is now in line with her body and shes now eating everything out of her bowl again. She wasnt showing any signs of neck trouble but there was something that was bothering her which only seemed to cause a problem with her putting her head down to eat, she still isnt showing any sign of pain anywhere, runs around fine, plays etc but is eating better now the bowl is raised.

This post has been edited by daftdog: 8th Jul 2017, 2:51 pm
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nikirushka
post 8th Jul 2017, 4:14 pm
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QUOTE(mokee @ 7th Jul 2017, 9:33 pm) *

I'd be inclined to go back to the vets and ask them to do some tests to find out why your dog is off their food. Dogs don't just stop eating for no reason, a blood test would show if there were some problem with kidney or liver damage, at the very least.

When one of my old girls went off her food the vet put her on mirtazipine, which is a human antidepressant but also an appetite stimulant.


I need a 'like' button for this!

'Old age' issues in our animals are rarely just that but have a medical basis that can be treated. If he's off his food then he should be checked out to be on the safe side. Pain from arthritis as well as a variety of other things can cause a drop in appetite.
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Dalsmum
post 9th Jul 2017, 9:08 am
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I would agree feed him what he will eat.

If he will eat small amounts then feed four, five or six times a day ( if you can).

Offer small amounts with more available rather than a lot at one time which can be off putting.

My old dogs have liked and done well on tinned Chappie- not the dried- although it is low fat.

Raw green tripe stinks but usually goes down well. P@H sell it.
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ebd
post 23rd Jul 2017, 8:58 am
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How's your pup doing, Agilitymad?

Formerly Fat Grabby, now 16 and 3/4 and thin as a rail crying.gif has been struggling with his appetite. We have days where he eats well, days where he doesn't. We have done every sensible exam, looked for all the usual suspects. Sure, he has a lot of health problems... yet it is clear that despite the inappetence he hasn't given up. My vets are in agreement, this is a dog who still enjoys his life. So...

My vet says that at this point any calorie is a good calorie. Seriously. As long as it isn't toxic, if Grabby shows interest I offer it to him. Dry food, wet food, homecooked, jars of baby food, liver paste tubes, freeze dried treats, any human food - sliced deli meats, cheese, cookies, icecream... Any calorie is a good calorie.

Texture seems important. If dry, I usually crumble up whatever I give him so that he can sort of lick it down. If wet, sometimes adding beef broth to make the food a bit more liquid so he can slurp it helps.

Smell is important - again, the beef broth or slightly warming food seems to help.

Rotating food also seems to help - what he ate yesterday he might not want today, so I keep trying new things. (Thank doG for Jester and Nora, who are happy with Grabby's leftovers.)

Wet food needs to be freshly opened, so I go for small pouches or tiny cans. Yes, it's more expensive this way. Terra Canis, Hermann's seem to be more tempting more of the time.

Also totally cr*p food, things I'd never feed otherwise. Low end grocery store brands, the canine equivalent of junk food, can sometimes be more appealing. Whatever - any calorie is a good calorie.

A secret weapon - Walkers Shortbread. Super high calorie, 500cal in 100g. Each cookie is about 100calories. When all else fails, this is a way to get in some dense calories. He eats these crumbled.

Beaphar Multi Vitamin paste, which is dairy based, has been better accepted than the malt based vitamin pastes. If necessary I put a bit on the roof of his mouth or in his cheek, he's then automatically swallow it. 6cm for a 10kg dog.

Note the time when your pup seems more likely to eat. Grabby will not eat in the mornings, so I plan my day to be around early afternoon so I can feed him then. Also sometimes Grabby will get up at 2 Am, and often will eat then. But don't try to feed at times when you know he is unlikely to eat, unless of course he shows interest.

Grabby is on Omeprazole for stomach acid, and we have just started the Big Guns: Remeron (Mirtazapine) to try to stimulate his appetite. This is a human anti-depressant, but is now used in veterinary medicine (at least here in Switzerland) as a stop-gap appetite stimulant. As we have just started I don't have any data yet, but will update this thread when I see how the Remeron works.

Talk to your vet in the first instance. Try to find a cause for the inappetence - or at least to rule out the likely suspects. And do consider meds if your vet believes they would be appropriate in your old friend's case.

Lastly - try not to stress. Yes there are days when it seems all I do is count Grabby's calories - but I try not to let him see my stress as it affects him. Relax as best you can. (Easy to say, hard to do.) I find measuring progress over the week rather than daily helps put me in a better frame of mind.

Sending all sorts of empathetic hug.gif and 'hearty appetite' thoughts your way.

This post has been edited by ebd: 23rd Jul 2017, 9:02 am
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mokee
post 24th Jul 2017, 2:24 pm
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QUOTE(ebd @ 23rd Jul 2017, 9:58 am) *


Grabby is on Omeprazole for stomach acid, and we have just started the Big Guns: Remeron (Mirtazapine) to try to stimulate his appetite. This is a human anti-depressant, but is now used in veterinary medicine (at least here in Switzerland) as a stop-gap appetite stimulant. As we have just started I don't have any data yet, but will update this thread when I see how the Remeron works.



Tarry responded very well to Mirtazipine for quite a few weeks, that was back in 2011/2012 and it was new to me, I'd never heard of it being used as an appetite stimulant before.
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