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> Reaction To Toys, This happened today
doggyvonne
post 29th Nov 2017, 1:58 pm
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I have had my Yorkie just 5 days and she's settling in well-met a few nice dogs nose to nose in street and chilled out and seems desperate to get up close and sniffing with every dog and person she meets but I am being cautious in this'honeymoon' period in case there are issues as yet unrevealed. I have an elderly neighbour with a very placid collie who i have visited many times and played with her and her soft sheep toy. I rang and asked if i could take my dog around for a meet and greet as i knew the collie was no threat. We went round and i let her off in the neighbour's house to explore. The darling collie brought her sheep to me and i threw it for her which she retrieved and then did a surprising thing and dropped it in front my Yorkie girl...aaaahh how lovely however when my dog did not play as expected the collie went to pickup her sheep and mine did an open mouthed snap..more of a catty hiss than bared teeth but nonetheless i was very surprised. My dog didnt want the sheep and didnt want to play but she sort of snarled at the collie for wanting to play??? It might have been ok if there was no toy I suppose? I am left wondering if i should not go there again -i was very embarrassed and also asking myself why the toy was a bone of contention when she never plays with her own soft toys at home? The toys came with her when i homed her. I hope we can get round this problem as i do want her to be sociable when i eventually have her spayed and let her off lead. I naively expected her to give a much larger dog (bitch) some respect.
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nikirushka
post 29th Nov 2017, 2:33 pm
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I would expect a terrier to be far more overbearing in any situation regardless of the size of the other dog. Their personality tends to be MUCH bigger than their body.

In this instance, it sounds like your dog was uncomfortable with having a much larger dog moving straight at her and in close quarters - the toy I suspect was incidental, although she could have been guarding it. But with no normal interest, more likely to be because a large, unknown dog tried to grab close to her.

I think you really need consider your first sentence - you have only had her for 5 days. It takes a new dog longer than this to settle in and find their feet, even if she generally seems settled, and although she may be sociable in the street, that is different to being in close proximity to a large, playful dog in an enclosed situation. If she's met a number of dogs already that may also have had an impact and the collie was just one dog too many for her to cope with at this moment in time (exacerbated by the particulars of the encounter).

Slow down, give her time and space. As she is unspayed then she may also be heading into a season, which can cause grumpiness in some dogs.
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doggyvonne
post 29th Nov 2017, 2:36 pm
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Thank you for that.
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mokee
post 29th Nov 2017, 3:54 pm
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I was about to say exactly the same as Niki. I've adopted about a dozen dogs in the last 20 years and I don't even walk them for the first week, just let them find their feet at home. To be honest if you keep exposing your dog to situations where she's frightened enough to feel like she needs to react you're setting yourselves up for huge problems in the future. From my own experience of growing up with Yorkies they are generally highly intelligent and independent little dogs who learn very quickly, especially things that you don't want them to learn (but I'm sure you've read up on all this before you decided to home one and I'm preaching to the choir).

They also, in my experience, have absolutely no concept of the difference in size between big dogs and little ones, and only show respect when another dog has well and truly earned it. I've seen a couple of Yorkies see off a Dobe they didn't like the look of in the past.

This post has been edited by mokee: 29th Nov 2017, 4:13 pm
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