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woofgang
post 9th Apr 2017, 11:26 am
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Running on from comments in the rare breeds thread and as someone whose first dog was not considered appropriate for a first time dog owner...
What breeds do you consider not appropriate for first time owners IN THE UK and why?

also what breeds do you consider to be appropriate for first time owners IN THE UK and why?


please note this is not about rescue versus good breeder versus byb....lets assume we are talking about decent examples of the breed in all cases.

I will kick this off by saying that, from what i know of them, I think that the european breeds bred to be independent flock guardians are not appropriate because of their size and character

This post has been edited by woofgang: 9th Apr 2017, 11:26 am
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Tigerthedog
post 9th Apr 2017, 1:22 pm
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Sled dogs. Wolf hybrids. Fighting breeds (because of the huge amount of work needed to socialise them).

But mostly I think we should be looking at ways of 'breeding' more responsible owners.

My heart sinks when people tell me proudly that their dog is from working stock as well. Oh, right, so that means high energy, and high training needs!

This post has been edited by Tigerthedog: 9th Apr 2017, 1:23 pm
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woofgang
post 9th Apr 2017, 2:18 pm
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I am not sure that wolf hybrids or fighting breeds are appropriate for ANYONE in the Uk to own.
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ceri1
post 9th Apr 2017, 2:26 pm
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I'd say a lot of staffies would make a good first dog: really people friendly, enjoy a cuddle, responsive to training and most of the ones I see out and about seem pretty dog tolerant.
My 1st dog was a staffy x whippet and was great: polite to people and dogs, fairly obedient, happy to join in with whatever you were doing, but also no separation anxiety or other problems.
Winston, however, would not make a great first dog: despite our best efforts at socialisation and training, his genetics kicked in at puberty, leaving us with a boy who does worry about things a lot (growls at noises outside the house, for instance) and will bite dogs he doesn't know, if they get in his face. His background might put him more in the "fighting dog" category, but he's great with people dogs and other animals he does know and the most loving dog ever.
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Carolynleah
post 9th Apr 2017, 3:19 pm
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This is trickier than it first looks - I was thinking a labrador would be a good first dog, then realised how much trouble a young, untrained lab could cause! Definately not a working strain springer or cocker spaniel. Staffies are brilliant, so good with people, especially children, and not too big while being sturdy. However, quite a few are not that keen on other dogs. Our first dog was a mixture - she looked like a small black lab but I think there was some collie and perhaps German shepherd in her - a brilliant, easy dog who was good with people/other dogs/livestock and had a long and healthy life. We were just lucky, I think.

This post has been edited by Carolynleah: 9th Apr 2017, 3:20 pm
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Tigerthedog
post 9th Apr 2017, 4:31 pm
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Akitas are a fighting breed. Perfectly legal, but such tricky dogs to bring up right! And certainly not a first, or even second dog IMO.

And no, agree about wolf hybrids, but I have been approached about walking one. If it really was one than 1/16 still made for a tricky dog. I suspect, however, that the breeders saw someone coming because it looked huskyish to me. And already under-socialised at 8 months.

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EmCHammer
post 9th Apr 2017, 7:04 pm
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We have rehomed some of or more difficult dogs with younger first time homes (akita x and staffie types spring to mind) and the thing that jumped out with these families was their preparedness to work with the dogs and judge them for who they were not jyst say a dog aggressive dog. Slightly different in that talking about problem dogs rather than a breed of dog.

They researched and was prepared to listen and learn. Of course alot of people think they can do ok with one of the problem dogs and then realise they can't.

We had a beagle in recently my goodness he didn't sound like a dog for the faint hearted had seperation anxiety would howl was a resource guarder and couldn't go off lead. All quite normal for a beagle but wasn't sure if I could have coped !

Pudding g was our first dog. Fab in the home but could be a real bully and had a pop at people who scared her.. including biting a police man on the ankle .. we learnt alot as first time dog owners but then again I learn something new with all of mine .

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Hannah W
post 10th Apr 2017, 7:57 am
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In the same way that we blame 'Deed, not Breed' in cases of attacks, I don't think there is any such thing as a 'breed for first time owners'. Its the first time owner thats the important thing to get right, not the breed. Dog training IMHO is usually less about the dog, and more about training the owner to respond correctly to the dog.

FWIW we've been owned by a soft lab (unless you were another dog and then he was a fighter), a softer ex breeding lab (everythings fabulous unless you are a puppy, we didn't like those), and cocker spaniel (come on then if you think you're hard enough) and now a chocolate lab bitch (fooooooood mummy... more fooooooooood). each had their own faults and challenging behaviour. All could have been described as first dogs.
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nikirushka
post 10th Apr 2017, 8:03 am
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Generally speaking, I would say the gentler versions of breeds would be the way to go: show or pet line, not working, and of the staples such as labs, yorkies, spaniels etc. Definitely not dogs like working collies, patterdales, some of the gundogs such as weims and so on.

Even within those there will be challenges - lab puppies can be absolute sods! - but by getting a 'dumbed down' version of a breed there's a better chance of success. Or better, go to a reputable rescue centre and choose a calm adult dog!

Of my own breeds (dobes, malinois, collies) I wouldn't say any are suitable as first-timers on the face of it, but a dobermann could be: many are difficult but many are really sound, easy dogs to get along with, provided they have enough stimulation. The only problem then is the health as the ones from really good, healthy lines and solid breeding tend to have European blood, which then ramps up the drives and energy.

I agree that the livestock guardians would absolutely not be my choice for a first-time owner, ever. And it worries me greatly that the caucasians are now here and multiplying, and are already in the hands of the greeders. Of course some are good dogs but on the whole, I do not believe they are ready to be a pet dog in your average family home and they are being advertised as that.

If I had to pick any one breed - and I may well be shot down for this - I would actually not pick a breed, but the cockerpoo (something I never thought I'd say!). With very, very few exceptions, every one I've met has had a fantastic temperament and have been steady too. The one big exception to that was firstly in completely the wrong home, and secondly I strongly suspect was also bred from a working cocker. She was a lunatic!
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woofgang
post 10th Apr 2017, 8:33 am
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Interesting comment. I would not have thought of a dobe for a first dog...the ones I have met (not many) have had a definite tendency to guard their families. The lady who bred our first dogs used to suggest a rottie to people who she thought would make good owners but not for a wei....but then she knew breeders and knew where to send people.
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nikirushka
post 10th Apr 2017, 8:47 am
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I wouldn't for every owner, but they can be really good dogs and not too hard to raise - power chewers for sure, but not bad. Decent temperaments on most of them despite the BYBs, although there are exceptions to that of course!
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maisie666
post 10th Apr 2017, 8:54 am
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Retired racing greyhound (with advice from the rescue kennel). Mx
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woofgang
post 10th Apr 2017, 9:17 am
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QUOTE(maisie666 @ 10th Apr 2017, 8:54 am) *

Retired racing greyhound (with advice from the rescue kennel). Mx


forgive me but is that because you think people should rescue greys or because you think that greyhounds per se make good dogs for first time owners?

....because the “rules of the game” are not about rescue vs byb vs good breeder but about good examples of the breed itself regardless of where it came from

This post has been edited by woofgang: 10th Apr 2017, 9:17 am
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Louwra
post 10th Apr 2017, 1:16 pm
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I dont think you can state categorically ''this'' breed is a great one for starting of. I really depends on the owners, how dedicated, how much time can they invest, are they prepared to learn, to trian etc

My very first dog was a German Shepherd. But then I grew up with GSD and Bouviers, worked with dogs, I worked in rescues, I qualified as a vet nurse, so had a reasonable idea of what to expect.

For a person/familiy who never had a dog before, I feel a GSD wouldnt be the right dog, even if it was the best of the breed smile.gif

Too many factors play a role

Difficult!

This post has been edited by Louwra: 10th Apr 2017, 1:17 pm
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Ragsysmum
post 10th Apr 2017, 3:23 pm
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Easiest start would be an adult dog from a foster home with a reputable rescue group.
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