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> Should Rare Breeds Be Moved To Breed Rescue?, Interesting subject brought up in another thread
mokee
post 24th Mar 2017, 1:58 pm
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Really interesting point brought up in another thread - if a rare or unusual breed shows up in general rescue, should that rescue allow the dog to move to a breed rescue if they offer it a place? Should they actively look for a breed rescue to take it in or should they go ahead and rehome it themselves?
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zico's mum
post 24th Mar 2017, 3:49 pm
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Tough one as so many variables.If the rescue is a very experienced one rehoming a large variety of dogs then they will be perfectly capable of finding the most appropriate home no matter what the breed.Smaller rescues may not have that experience? And the breed would also have to be taken into consideration - I do think some specific breeds - eg the Carpathian Shepherd,Kangals,Akbash and similar guarding breeds need specialised knowledge.
I do get frustrated with some breed rescues who will not work with general rescues and have seen some very nasty threads on FB when specific breeds come into rescue. Many posts are downright insulting towards the rescue concerned insinuating they don't have the necessary knowledge (without knowing anything about them). Although very often it is not the breed rescue people saying this it's merely owners of the same breed rolleyes.gif and I have seen some breed rescues supporting a general rescue with one of "their" dogs.
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kayb
post 24th Mar 2017, 5:55 pm
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The rarer breeds are often (not always I know) easier to home as seen as more desirable. I know that will depend on what problems the dogs have come in with, but often the pounds will only let an "easier to home" dog go with a less easy such as a staffy or bull lurcher. It's the only currency they have to help get the staffies etc to safety so I say very much let them go to the general rescues if it means another life saved too.

If specialist knowledge is needed and the breed rescue truly cares about the dog, they will work with the general rescue and pass on potential suitable homes. If they won't do that, that suggests to me they are more interested in getting the adoption fee than getting the dog in the right home.

Not quite the same thing I know, but as much as there are some very good toy breed rescues out there, little fluffy cuties can be a licence to print money (not a criticism in itself, I have one myself). If for every five or six yorkies or chis they had to take a staffy x it would at least help to even things up.

This post has been edited by kayb: 24th Mar 2017, 5:57 pm
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Dalsmum
post 24th Mar 2017, 6:44 pm
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Some breed rescue will only take pure bred dogs so will not deal with strays as they do not have a pedigree to prove what they are .

Others will forward details of applicants on their books to a general rescue but the final decision will lie with the rescue.
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Craters_on_the_lawn
post 24th Mar 2017, 8:13 pm
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My experience is of fostering a Beddlington Terrier (and her lurcher best friend - they were handed in together) for a general rescue ( which takes all local dogs from the pound).

The general rescue was clear that was no need for the Beddlington should move to a breed rescue - however I did contact Bedlington rescue to see if they would help us to rehome her and her lurcher best friend. I knew it would not be so easy to find a home for both of them together - and they were a bonded-pair so they needed to stay together.

The breed rescue were very helpful - immediately offered to take her and her lurcher friend - which we politely declined - but more importantly they had a list of people registered with them who were waiting for a Beddlington to come into rescue. A quick ring-round and they found a couple who were willing - indeed happy- to adopt both dogs!

A happy and successful outcome! A good example of how general rescues and breed rescues can and should work together.

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My dear Grace (now at rainbow bridge) on the left, Echo in the middle and Jock her best friend on the left.

Lovely dogs - very hard to wave goodbye when they went - but the new owners have been kind enough to send me photo updates of how they are getting on. smile.gif


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ceri1
post 24th Mar 2017, 9:52 pm
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I agree that its great when rescues can work together. A breed rescue may know people who are already looking for that kind of dog and can point them in the direction of the dog in a non-breed rescue. I really don't see why pure bred dogs "must" go to a breed rescue. A general rescue will deal with all kinds of dog, big/small, old/young, lapdog/ scared dog/worky dog. Why assume they cant cope with a dog because it has a fancy coat (so what, many dogs have grooming requirements) or whatever?
A rescue local to me had in a viszla. They immediately got loads of messages on their facebook saying these were sensitive dogs who shouldnt be kenneled and it must go to breed rescue, where they would understand its needs. Just because it was a viszla. For all these people knew this particular dog could love kennels. This rescue (like many) has a number of staffy types who are doing really badly in kennels. No one kicks up a fuss about them. sad.gif
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natbest
post 25th Mar 2017, 9:59 am
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QUOTE(Craters_on_the_lawn @ 24th Mar 2017, 8:13 pm) *

My experience is of fostering a Beddlington Terrier (and her lurcher best friend - they were handed in together) for a general rescue ( which takes all local dogs from the pound).

The general rescue was clear that was no need for the Beddlington should move to a breed rescue - however I did contact Bedlington rescue to see if they would help us to rehome her and her lurcher best friend. I knew it would not be so easy to find a home for both of them together - and they were a bonded-pair so they needed to stay together.

The breed rescue were very helpful - immediately offered to take her and her lurcher friend - which we politely declined - but more importantly they had a list of people registered with them who were waiting for a Beddlington to come into rescue. A quick ring-round and they found a couple who were willing - indeed happy- to adopt both dogs!

A happy and successful outcome! A good example of how general rescues and breed rescues can and should work together.

Image

My dear Grace (now at rainbow bridge) on the left, Echo in the middle and Jock her best friend on the left.

Lovely dogs - very hard to wave goodbye when they went - but the new owners have been kind enough to send me photo updates of how they are getting on. smile.gif



I can agree with this, ive contacted a Bedlington rescue a few times about various Bedlington up and down country ive been offered and they've always gone to get them and get them a good home. Sadly since we got Noodle we've been offered 3 or 4, its a bit odd, almost like well you've got one, do you want another? Id very much like another pedigree type Lakeland terrier but cant see me getting one again from rescue as they're so rare. I think lots of breed rescues are great, some are a bit snotty only accepting dogs with pedigrees but most care a lot. Thing is yes, some breeds do maybe have a few things you need to learn, but believe me I knew nothing about either of my two, and I learnt, I have every book, belong to various breed specific forums and I've educated myself.
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Craters_on_the_lawn
post 25th Mar 2017, 5:07 pm
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QUOTE(natbest @ 25th Mar 2017, 9:59 am) *

Thing is yes, some breeds do maybe have a few things you need to learn, but believe me I knew nothing about either of my two, and I learnt, I have every book, belong to various breed specific forums and I've educated myself.


Exactly - and any good general rescue would do the same.

I certainly learnt lots about Beddlingtons while Echo stayed with us! It was very interesting to observe Echo and then compare with what I could find out about Beddlingtons via the internet and general dog breed books.

A general wide-ranging experience with all sorts of dogs, coupled with a willingness to do some research into the specific breed - and any good general rescue should be able to cope with just about anything that turns up.

However there may be some very specialist breeds where a breed rescue may have the facilities to cope better than a general rescue - For example Great Danes - I saw something about a Great Dane breed rescue recently on TV where they had extra large kennels (much bigger than normal) and a sofa for each dog to sleep on.
And some of them had been there for a very long time (months or years sad.gif ).
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Annieskel
post 26th Mar 2017, 8:31 am
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A lot depends on why people are in rescue, I have seen far too many people only interested in the power, the dogs come second, there are some lovely people in rescue as well who put the dogs first and will let them go to another rescue for the dog's sake. It is the same with breed rescues, it depends on who is running the rescue.

How are people to get experience of a breed if they never get the chance to have one? I had only known Lab crosses until Joe came into my life, he was a Whippet/JRT, next came my Greyhound who was one of 6 Greyhounds brought over from Northern Ireland. Then a Staffie/Cairn, now she was a real education. I then offered to foster a Staffie so she could recover in a home instead of kennels after 2 massive tumours were taken off her, all she knew was how to love. I was terrified of taking her on thanks to the media, I didn't believe what was being said in my head but my heart said differently. It was a wonderful decision to take her.

These dogs taught me so much and thanks to them I was able to take dogs that had much worse problems and help my last dog in Jamie who was so traumatised.

There are people I would never trust with a dog no matter what the breed was, some people are more suited to have a certain type and in Jamie's case, the people who brought him over are wonderful with dogs that have health problems but didn't have a clue with a traumatised dog.

I worked in rescue we sent dogs from a pound to various rescues, there was a new one to us but had been going for a while, we asked their criteria and it fitted in with us and we asked around for information on them, it was all positive so we let them have a Staffie which they asked for. A few weeks later I was contacted about this dog, it seems that the kennel staff were frightened of Staffies and would go into his kennel with a brush in front of him and kept threatening him with it. This dog was turning aggressive thanks to the kennel staff. We pulled the dog out and took him back, he was rehomed and was never a problem again. That rescue never got another dog off us.






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Kanie
post 27th Mar 2017, 9:20 am
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I think rescues should make an attempt to contact Breed Rescue and ask if they can help - whether it be by taking the dog into their care, or passing on interested contacts, or providing an information pack about the breed and any specific grooming requirements or typical quirks. Some breed rescues will help - others might not - but I think all rescues and breed rescues have to go in open-minded and not think 'because Breed X rescue wouldn't help - breed Y rescue won't' or 'because Rescue X told us to mind our own business, Rescue Y will do the same!"

Another good source of help can be breed clubs. They vary according to the committee and the resources they have at their disposal, but for the cost of a phone call or email, it could prove really helpful.

When I did breed rescue, I had some great experiences with general rescues and helped find homes for a few crossbreeds and pure-bred dogs. I also had a couple of real let-downs which I frustratingly, I suspect came from a degree of prejudice about purebred dogs. In the first case, a rescue had deliberately rehomed a dog suffering from a hereditary condition, without informing the new owners of the severity and when approached by the breed club and asked if they would let us have the Kennel Club registration papers, they refused because it was 'policy'. We explained how the information would be used (to build up our understanding of the condition and make sure the breeder was aware they had bred affected dogs) but we were still refused.

The second really frustrating thing happened when a dog in rescue was not actually our breed at all, but a similar one in many ways - but one big difference.....the adult coat was high-maintenance! At first, the rescue contacted us and were very keen for advice, but once they read out the name of the breed, we realised it was not the same animal at all and urged them to tell the owner they had lined up (who they told us specifically did not want a long-coated or high-maintenance dog)

We pulled together a list of contacts in the breed who would be happy to advise on grooming and would let the new owner come and visit and see their adult dogs and learn about grooming and general care, but it was never passed on. The new owner posted on another site how pleased she was with her puppy - still under the impression it was 'our' breed and when I contacted her and sent all the information direct to her, she was still seemingly not convinced. I hope she fell in love with her puppy anyway and they are still together - but it would have been nice to know the outcome!

It wasn't about being 'breedist' - both are lovely breeds, but surely a rescue of all places should appreciate the importance of honesty about a dog's care requirements?

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Annieskel
post 27th Mar 2017, 3:09 pm
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QUOTE(Kanie @ 27th Mar 2017, 10:20 am) *

It wasn't about being 'breedist' - both are lovely breeds, but surely a rescue of all places should appreciate the importance of honesty about a dog's care requirements?



Many rescues are not honest about the dogs they let people adopt, twice I have been lied to by a rescue and is why I prefer to go direct to a pound now when I want a dog, they have been honest with me.

There is a rescue that I will never foster again for, the dog came to me because he had put several fosterers in A & E and no other fosterer will take him, it was either come here or be pts. I never found him a problem, he was a very loving dog who just wanted to fit in but didn't know how to. Later I found out that the rescue behaviourist told the fosterers to alpha roll him to get him under control. Bertie was a JRT/Maltese, no wonder the fosterers were attacked, it was the behaviourists fault not the dog's. At least they told me he was aggressive, the problem was, he wasn't aggressive, he was a lovely natured boy.


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MRCHEW
post 6th Apr 2017, 8:54 pm
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I know of one breed rescue that work with another, getting homes for breed crosses.
The one I'm involved in take crosses, but then it's a fairly obvious cross.
My Dotty is a cross from them and foster boy is a cross, they do contact general rescues if they have that breed, to offer advise on behaviour problems that may make dog bounce back into rescue or if general rescue are happy to allow them to take dog.
I would also like to say a breed isn't rare if it has to have a rescue, any rare breeder should offer life time back up and it should also be for offspring of their sold on dogs. If you are not prepared to stand by breed don't be off loading puppies to anyone.
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Louwra
post 7th Apr 2017, 7:08 am
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QUOTE(MRCHEW @ 6th Apr 2017, 9:54 pm) *


I would also like to say a breed isn't rare if it has to have a rescue, any rare breeder should offer life time back up and it should also be for offspring of their sold on dogs. If you are not prepared to stand by breed don't be off loading puppies to anyone.



This!! smile.gif ok.gif

If only!!
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Kanie
post 7th Apr 2017, 8:42 am
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QUOTE(Louwra @ 7th Apr 2017, 8:08 am) *

This!! smile.gif ok.gif

If only!!


Absolutely agree! Just like to add that all breeders, no matter what the breed or cross, should be prepared to offer lifelong support to the new owners of any dog they have bred and if necessary, take it back.

I'd rather see fewer breeds (or even go back to 'types' in some instances) with bigger genepools. It frustrates me that the Kennel Club keeps on adding new breeds to the Register, because so many are brought to the UK purely as vanity projects, with no real appreciation of the breed's function (otherwise they would have left them in their country of origin, guarding, hunting, herding or whatever and just enjoyed seeing them in their natural environment) It's all well and good saying, "I want a Moldovian Trufflehound" but that doesn't mean you have to establish the breed in the UK and push for the right to show it at KC shows, or set up a flashy website to sell puppies for the price of an entire village in Moldovia lol.gif

On the other side, I think breeders who produce litter after litter of popular breeds and crosses like Staffies, cockerpooos, French Bulldogs (who thought we'd be calling them popular 10 years ago?) and Pugs are every bit as irresponsible. Just because a breed is popular, it doesn't mean it is 'easy' - look at working cockers, or 'healthy' (as in able to breathe)

The bottom line for me is that no breeder should have to advertise and if they can't find enough people who they trust enough and like enough to sell a pup to and keep in touch, the solution is blindingly obvious: don't mate your bitch!
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Penninepoodlewelfare
post 7th Apr 2017, 9:30 am
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QUOTE(Kanie @ 7th Apr 2017, 8:42 am) *

Absolutely agree! Just like to add that all breeders, no matter what the breed or cross, should be prepared to offer lifelong support to the new owners of any dog they have bred and if necessary, take it back.

I'd rather see fewer breeds (or even go back to 'types' in some instances) with bigger genepools. It frustrates me that the Kennel Club keeps on adding new breeds to the Register, because so many are brought to the UK purely as vanity projects, with no real appreciation of the breed's function (otherwise they would have left them in their country of origin, guarding, hunting, herding or whatever and just enjoyed seeing them in their natural environment) It's all well and good saying, "I want a Moldovian Trufflehound" but that doesn't mean you have to establish the breed in the UK and push for the right to show it at KC shows, or set up a flashy website to sell puppies for the price of an entire village in Moldovia lol.gif

On the other side, I think breeders who produce litter after litter of popular breeds and crosses like Staffies, cockerpooos, French Bulldogs (who thought we'd be calling them popular 10 years ago?) and Pugs are every bit as irresponsible. Just because a breed is popular, it doesn't mean it is 'easy' - look at working cockers, or 'healthy' (as in able to breathe)

The bottom line for me is that no breeder should have to advertise and if they can't find enough people who they trust enough and like enough to sell a pup to and keep in touch, the solution is blindingly obvious: don't mate your bitch!

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