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> Dog Initially Fine With Other Dogs Then....
Brettarider
post 16th Dec 2016, 6:31 pm
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We have 3yr old male rescue who's been neutered in June, When we got him he lived pretty much OK with our older dog who was 10 with the odd minor tiff as you'd expect. However our older dog was PTS due to illness in Sept. We have introduced him to other dogs and has initially been fine when outside walk off the lead together with no issues. However in one case when we got back to the mother in laws home and sitting outside in the garden our dog suddenly went for the dog he'd been fine with out the blue with no provocation from the other dog. Nothing serious and more just mouthing



Today the wife took him to other family member who have a pup and watch a dog almost similar age both female again playing fine outside with no drama's however once in the house did the same to both dogs jumped onto their back and had a bit of mouth at them.


Any ideas what the cause of this could be and best way to resolve? I'm assuming treat base reward for ignoring them would be a start/best way to go.
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Annieskel
post 17th Dec 2016, 9:09 am
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Do you know what his history is?


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Brettarider
post 17th Dec 2016, 2:12 pm
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Nothing other than picked up as a stray was fine with the other dgs in the kennel and with our other dog. Not sure if its a dominance thing.
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nikirushka
post 17th Dec 2016, 2:58 pm
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A dominant dog is not aggressive - they are calm and confident.

This could be a few things - bullying; fear (panic response/stress building to a level the dog can't cope with); him having no clue how to play properly - trying it, being too rough then it tipping into aggression when he realises he doesn't know what he's doing and can't cope; medical; a combination of the above or something else.

I suggest getting someone in (APBC or IMDT are good organisations to look at to find someone) to observe him around other dogs to establish why he's doing it and guide you on how to train him not to. Whoever you get will not need to see the whole behaviour (or shouldn't do anyway) - they'll get enough clues from body language and minor behaviours around other dogs to work out what's going on.

This post has been edited by nikirushka: 17th Dec 2016, 2:59 pm
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Fever
post 17th Dec 2016, 3:46 pm
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I agree with the above that it needs a professional who actually sees the dog, and I would add that although the dog might have,appeared to you to be fine with other dogs, chances are you missed some of the more subtle signs of discomfort both in him and in other dogs. Dogs that are fine with other dogs generally have quiet, low key interactions such as sniffing the same area together, whereas dogs that do a lot of boisterous play are quite often less skilled and less comfortable with other dogs.
In my experience these things are never out of the blue and there will have been a quiet build up to these incidents. The most important thing to do now is to control the dog so ge can't practise the behaviour until you can get some professional help.
Factors such as his recent neutering and the death of his companion are also huge factors in his life.
Good luck! Hope you can find some help!
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nikirushka
post 17th Dec 2016, 5:18 pm
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There's also the factor of environmental change: coming from outside, more space, room to maneuvre then coming inside the house where there is a lot less space. For some dogs it reduces stress as the other dog tends to be less active, so easier to cope with (plus feeling more secure on home ground); for some it increases stress because of the reduction in space, increase in scent of one particular dog etc.
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