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> How To Stimulate A Dog Who Doesnt Play?, Advice welcome
doggyvonne
post 26th Nov 2017, 11:17 am
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I know that not all dogs are playful but my new Yorkie age 4 does get bored and restless and i am wondering how to occupy her if she isnt playful with toys or chews? Absolute angel really but i want her to enjoy life and if the weather gets much colder we will have to amuse her more indoors rather than long walks. I am supposing a small dog is less resilient to cold but someone will prove me wrong? Having been brought up with kids it surprises me she doesnt show interest in any sort of toy and wondering if she could learn to play at this stage of her life as an adult?
We need to get her spayed and is it possible she will be more interested in other things once she is done?
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woofgang
post 26th Nov 2017, 2:12 pm
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Well she might feel the cold or not but a cosy coat should fix that if she likes to go out. Are you sure she is restless because she is bored? Can I ask how much you know about her background generally? Being brought up with children doesn't necessarily mean she had toys or was played with in a proper way......
Can i ask how long she has been with you? Do you know what her routine was like in her previous house?

Does she like food? if she does then there are food puzzles for dogs or you can screw up a biscuit or a piece of dry food in paper and let her rip the paper apart to get to the food.
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doggroomer
post 26th Nov 2017, 6:40 pm
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As she's new to you, it may be that she needs to get used to her new home, and this may be why she's a bit restless. You did say, in your other thread, that she was settling in well, but everything's different to her at the moment, so give her time to 'get her feet under the table' and she may well surprise you and start showing a cheeky side.

My 4 kg Pom X doesn't mind walking in cold weather, coat or no coat.

Chris
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doggyvonne
post 26th Nov 2017, 8:03 pm
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Just to answer a few of the replies..she had no balls or chewy toys just soft toys and they came with her but she hasn't looked at them. She has been very active which I like and rushes from room to room , on and off furniture and beds (we live in a half open plan bungalow on one floor). She does a very puppylike mouthy game with my fingers but i tried to replace fingers with a toy and she switches off. It is only day three since i homed her but she's not shown any distress, fear or aggression. I have walked her 3 times today as its all she seems to want and she runs not walks so I have to up my game! She's the sweetest of creatures until she hears a rat in the garden and then she growls low under her breath. It doesnt matter to me if she never plays but I thought games might give her a more interesting life. I know a lot about her background and i have the previous owner 's contacts and is on my FB page. Really loving family but serious illness and a new baby meant they couldnt manage. As she is slightly overweight for a Yorkie i dont want to use treats in games. Maybe i am just realising the difference in the breeds as my last dog was Parson JRT and was acutely intelligent and learned tricks within minutes and could play hide and seek with his toys. This little love doesnt seem to know what a ball or a nylabone is?
Her activity may not be restless or bored so much as excited i really dont know. I wanted an energetic dog because it energises me but I would like to engage with her more-that's how i trained my last dog-she seems a bit more distant than he was and not listening to the words i say ? I find it surprising that a 4 year old dog understands s0 few words and i am just wondering if i can hope to teach her more words and activities at this late stage?

This post has been edited by doggyvonne: 26th Nov 2017, 8:12 pm
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woofgang
post 26th Nov 2017, 8:33 pm
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In time yes you can.....but from what you are telling me, whatever the family you have got her from tell you...well I won't bad mouth them but maybe there were "gaps" in her upbringing. Food games can be played.....you just use some of her meal ration for the game. My dogs get about a fifth of their daily ration in their bowls, the rest is given as treats and rewards through the day...that doesn't mean they have to work for it.....just that when I have lunch, they get food too....same with afternoon tea and when they get in the car....just because.... smile.gif
While I agree you don't want her to get any bigger, I wouldn't be agonising too much about weight loss while she is so new to you.... What she needs now in a new place is time and a bit of stability.
All the rushing around may be stress.....does she settle and sleep well?
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doggroomer
post 26th Nov 2017, 11:16 pm
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I have to say, before I started grooming, I thought of Yorkies as yappy little lap dogs, as all the ones I'd met previously were. But I found they were mostly very intelligent and soon picked up what I said to them on the grooming table. The more you talk to her, the more she will get to understand you. Most of the ones I groomed soon learned what 'ok, turn round now' and 'let's do your face now' and other little 'commands' were wub.gif

Even the older ones soon picked it all up too. I think she'll soon understand what you're saying and it sounds like she'll be a fun little dog once she's used to you. Maybe she wasn't talked to much in her last home as not all dog owners have chats with their dogs rolleyes.gif By the way, Yorkies can live very long lives, so 4 years old is still a youngster smile.gif

Chris

This post has been edited by doggroomer: 26th Nov 2017, 11:21 pm
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nikirushka
post 29th Nov 2017, 9:34 am
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QUOTE(doggyvonne @ 26th Nov 2017, 8:03 pm) *

I find it surprising that a 4 year old dog understands s0 few words and i am just wondering if i can hope to teach her more words and activities at this late stage?


Not surprising at all to me! Dogs only know what their owner teaches them. For some, that might be hundreds of cues; for others, only a few as that's all the owner needs from a pet dog.

4 is not 'late' in any case - dogs can be taught at any age (I'm starting scentwork next week with one of my 4 year olds and I'll be applying what I learn to all of my dogs, aged 4-13) and 4 is still very young for a breed that can live well into late teens. And bright. If you teach her, she will learn smile.gif
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nikirushka
post 29th Nov 2017, 9:36 am
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Also, different dogs learn differently and have different levels of intelligence, even within the same breed or type - my 13yo dobermann is thick as a plank bless her, but quick to learn practical things like recall or where the nearest mouse is. By comparison to the other two dobes I've had though, she should be wearing a dunce hat!
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Louwra
post 8th Dec 2017, 1:51 pm
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Give her time. She has only just arrived, and everything is new to her. Maybe she doesnt know toys are for play, maybe nobody ever played with her and toys. Lots of owners seem to assume a dog knows what a toy is for, and then then are surprised when the toys are forgotten.

Start to get to know her, all her quirks, find out what her trigger is for anything, start of with little things like a simple sit. She may just surprise you smile.gif

Just enjoy and let her get settled in so she knows what her home is now . She does sound really lovely!
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