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> Barking At Windows
bix
post 27th Jan 2018, 12:08 pm
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We have two miniature schnauzers. The older one is fine but the 9 month old, who we've had for about 6 weeks is struggling to cope with our floor to ceiling windows and the many dogs and people who walk past. I took some advice and have kept the blinds down in one room and have obscured the other a bit, but some is not accessible. She gets very wound up, so I'm trying to avoid it happening. I found putting her on a house lead seems to help her to relax. These can only be short term measures and eventually she will have to get used to this house. I realise this is early days, but how do we transition from this to a normal household please?
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tangojulie
post 27th Jan 2018, 7:23 pm
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I wish I knew! We've had exactly this for a few years now and are just about to get some more help from a behaviourist. What has worked to some extent is taking every opportunity to reinforce impulse control in many different situations. What has definitely not worked is using management as a long term solution.

We also had some success with Karen Overall's relaxation protocol, which is a very carefully structured set of apparently daft things to do while your dog is calmly watching you. That was going well when the daft things were things like walk around the dog, go out of the room, clap hands etc but when it came to noises of unknown origin (eg tap quietly on a door) I couldn't find a level she could cope with, and I didn't think it mattered because we had good management in place. But it turned out to be not good enough.

So FWIW my advice would be to get to the root of the behaviour and commit to tackling that, while at the same time avoiding it happening as you're already doing, and helping her to improve her own self control. I regret thinking that just the last two would be sufficient.

Sorry this is not so much practical advice as 'don't do what I did'. I'll post some links to the impulse control exercises we used and the relaxation protocol if I can find them.

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nikirushka
post 28th Jan 2018, 12:37 pm
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Honestly, by far the best success I've had and seen is by putting up self-adhesive frosting on the windows. It can be a very difficult behaviour to address because people come past at random times, and most dogs are territorial to a degree. Schnauzers on top of that can be reactive little dogs - bark first, think later! As all of those reactions with window barking carry stress it can affect other areas of life so to me, management is by far the preferable option here.

I put frosting up 10 years ago now, when I got my dobermann as she liked to stand on the sofa and wuff at people. No full barks, no fear etc, she loves people but she just liked to wuff all the time and it drove me nuts lol.gif Best thing I ever did though, especially once Linc was here. I did 3/4 frosting then he could see over the top and was territory barking so I did the last 1/4. Peace!

With little dogs you could just do 1/3 or 1/2 the window so you're not losing your own view.

QUOTE(tangojulie @ 27th Jan 2018, 7:23 pm) *

but when it came to noises of unknown origin (eg tap quietly on a door) I couldn't find a level she could cope with, and I didn't think it mattered because we had good management in place.


Have a look at this one from Kikopup. Start by knocking on non-door things, when she can see you, to desensitise to the noise, and then on the door in sight, before moving on to unseen.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpzvqN9JNUA&t=182s

Relaxation protocol - a good idea for any dog and I use this a lot with clients' dogs smile.gif

https://www.boulderhumane.org/sites/default...rRelaxation.pdf
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tangojulie
post 28th Jan 2018, 2:53 pm
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Thanks Niki
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bix
post 28th Jan 2018, 5:12 pm
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Thanks for your replies. Unfortunately we have a huge window over the stair well and it's not accessible to obscures head can stand at the top of the stairs and have a fabulous view! The design of the house is very modern and box like and the front is almost entirely glass. I will pursue the impulse control path. Thank you for reminding me. We can tolerate the occasional yap. Bertie, the older one sees the odd pedestrian that he doesn't like the look of, but Mollie, the pup is hysterical at every one
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nikirushka
post 29th Jan 2018, 10:09 am
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Ah I see! That does make it trickier for that window. But, easier in a way; what about putting a stairgate over the stairs for now, so you can control when she goes up there? That way you could just let her up when you're prepped to do a training session, and every time someone goes past, feed her as soon as she's spotted them (doesn't matter if she barks at this point). She should soon be seeing them then looking at you, then you can have her do whatever behaviour you'd prefer, and start getting that into a habit. At that point you can stop rewarding her when she barks and refine it to when she just sees them and looks at you quietly. Timing is important though!

Another option would be to teach a quiet cue - wait til she starts barking, then whizz a treat under a nose, say 'quiet' and hold it there for at least 5 seconds. Then reward for not barking. That pause is essential, so that she doesn't start barking to get a treat.

I'd still frost a bit of the floor to ceiling ones though. You can get various patterns of it too to make it look nicer.

This post has been edited by nikirushka: 29th Jan 2018, 10:10 am
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Petmurf
post 29th Jan 2018, 5:45 pm
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Another option would be to teach a quiet cue - wait til she starts barking, then whizz a treat under a nose, say 'quiet' and hold it there for at least 5 seconds. Then reward for not barking. That pause is essential, so that she doesn't start barking to get a treat

Good option Nikki, Iíll try that with my 3. Thank you 😊
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