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> Barking In Excitement, advice welcome
doggyvonne
post 14th Jan 2018, 5:30 pm
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I homed a really cute 5 year old Yorkie privately and she has no faults except over exuberance to meet people. Although she is an easy loving dog in the home she pulls a lot on her lead to get to other dogs and people sometimes with frantic high pitched barking. Once she can get to meet the object of her desire she calms down but I have to discern whether her approach is welcomed before allowing her to do so. Mostly the meetings are fine -very few people or dogs dislike her or need to be held back from her . It came as a great surprise to me today when a near neighbour who i respect and has her own two rescues described my furball as 'unbalanced'. The lady kindly but firmly delivered a lecture about training the dog not to do this. Now i am aware of the barking issues and i am doing what i can to stop the barking but given she has no recall yet i cant let her off lead anywhere to socialise and she has not been spayed-this has been delayed because she has a phantom pregnancy with milk too. the poor mite is desperate to meet other dogs and she loves children -she wouldnt hurt a fly and on the vet's advice i often let her finger play with my fingers in her mouth to get her used to having teeth brushed. I am 100 % sure she is 100% gentle with people. I dont shout at her because barking at her is pointless -she just barks more. I am doing the standard lead training moves and i stopped when she barks sometimes putting my hand gently round her face and firm but not loud 'no'. If this fails and the dog or person is not approachable i try to move on quickly or as a last resort i pick her up and then she stops immediately. Otherwise this hysteria can continue all down the street with her looking back. None of this is aggression it is pure excitement at seeing what she sees as her friends. A more darling dog you will never meet and she has no other faults at all but the barking may disturb others and she needs to calm down. Has anyone got any simple tips to deal with this? We hope she can be spayed soon and possibly this will tone her down a bit but who knows? She is our pet and i want everybody to see her as a good gentle dog which she is.
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ceri1
post 14th Jan 2018, 9:43 pm
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Really good video about training a frustrated greeter. She needs to learn that showing self restraint gets a reward. To do this you need to start at a distance...https://youtu.be/qu55IEUnNxU

Whilst you are training, you do want to avoid her "practicing" the crazy behaviour. She needs to learn that walks are calm and if every time she goes out she gets wound up, that won't happen. Avoid walks where she will see lots of dogs and people close up that she will bark whilst you are training calm.

This post has been edited by ceri1: 14th Jan 2018, 9:46 pm
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doggyvonne
post 15th Jan 2018, 7:44 am
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Thank you for responding. I went straight to that link. I am in bed still 7.am and that's how keen i am to take it all in but having watched 3 different sections on that link i can see the results but it isnt clear to me what the owner is doing to stop the dog being so happy, waggy, jumpy and pleased to meet you? The owner was walking past some other dogs who were not barking -this is usually the case on my walks . Apart from shortening the lead which i do anyway I cant see what the remedial activity is?? I can see that the dog with the problem is acting rather different to mine and seems more agitated or anxious than mine is..she isnt anxious at all and being very small she isnt that hard to restrain. It's more like she's seen daddy coming home and wagging her tail frantically to great him and get a greeting back. I still would like this to stop of course but as i said I cant see what has stopped the dog in the video from doing it? Sorry to sound stupid but i watched the severe leash clip 4 times and all i can see is the short lead which i do with some difficulty but i do it it right away unless the other owner is proactive to meet Millie. I have been told by the vet to let her meet other dogs as much as possible -he even told me to let her off in the park but she has no recall yet and if i had to chase her on wet mud i could slip. I am working on that in the garden and house and i think we may win with that eventually. We live up a steep hill which wends through the residential route to the park. At a distance of even 200 meters she will get her happy to meet you bark even if the other dog is playing chucker with its owner oblivious. I am as keen as anyone to stop this as the pulling is affecting my left arm somewhat. I am 61, quite short and have radiculopathy. Ironically my last dog was fear aggressive and was the opposite and would ignore all other dogs until they approached him closely and then would defend himself and me. I was 7 years telling people to stand away/dogs to stand away so i understand entirely if the other owners/dogs are disturbed by this exuberance of Millie's but i am 100% know she is the gentlest of souls and wouldnt be aggressive. I actually made a point of asking most owners if she could say 'hello' and 99 % it is fine and Millie quietens down when she's done the wag, sniff, circling thing. What i need to know here is what has made the naughty noisy dog go quiet in the video? All Millie wants is some friends and social contact. None of this greeting was reall bothering me until the neighbour called my dog 'unbalanced' and it was only then i realised the obsessive meet and greet it was regarded as a problem to others. I would only have regarded aggressive barking as a problem. On the walk going home she is often less ebullient.


This post has been edited by doggyvonne: 15th Jan 2018, 7:53 am
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kilmousk
post 15th Jan 2018, 11:23 am
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Sounds like you would be best getting a behaviourist in to show you ways of changing the behaviour in person before it becomes a bigger problem and more ingrained. They will be able to explain how to work below threshold, see subtle cues and demonstrate how to change the default reaction. They can also give advice regarding recall and loose lead walking. You would need to use a behaviourist that is up to date with modern training techniques and works force free and with positive methods.
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nikirushka
post 15th Jan 2018, 4:03 pm
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QUOTE(doggyvonne @ 15th Jan 2018, 7:44 am) *

What i need to know here is what has made the naughty noisy dog go quiet in the video?


1) other dog appears = this dog gets food! So dog begins to see dogs and look to the handler for his food, rather than kicking off straight away. Google the 'engage-disengage game' for an infographic on a neat way to start that.

2) consequence: this dog barks/lunges, other dog goes away. So his attempts to get closer with unruly behaviour have the opposite effect. Calmer behaviour gets what he wants (other dog gets closer).

In your situation, whenever she starts kicking off, move her further away. When she's calm, move her closer. You will most likely find that her behaviour will get worse in the short term because so far, she has been heavily rewarded for barking by getting to meet the other dog. It works, so she'll do it. And just like us, if it stops working, she won't just give up - if you've ever used a vending machine you have been well rewarded for putting your money in and pressing the button so when you press that button and the food doesn't budge, you don't just walk away. You press the button again, you press it harder, maybe multiple times, you might shake the machine too, before you give up. It's called an extinction burst and I would fully expect to see it but if you stick to your guns, NEVER allow her to meet another dog or human if she's barking and move her away when she starts (in addition to the feeding thing), you will win. It does take persistence though because her experience so far tells her that barking works, so it's not going to stop right away.

I'm not sure which bit you're talking about with the short leash - are you only watching the clip ceri1 linked to or are you going on to other clips? Just watch that first one.

Also, vets are neither trainers nor behaviourists. I agree with Kilmousk, you would really benefit from someone showing you how to work through this problem.
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nikirushka
post 15th Jan 2018, 4:09 pm
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Also, please stop taking hold of her face and telling her off! Same reason as startling her on your other post. It is easy to create a situation where she starts to become anxious rather than excited, and then you'll be in for a whole load of problems you don't currently have. Just move her away if she starts making a racket - unruly behaviour = no meeting. Nice and simple, and effective.

She doesn't need to run off lead for you to work on this behaviour, it is not about exercise but learning what works to get what she wants. If barking stops working, she will (after a while) stop doing it.
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doggyvonne
post 15th Jan 2018, 9:26 pm
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Thank you to you both. I had not heard about the dog getting a treat to distract him so perhaps i was indeed not looking at the right bit of the video. All is aw was a section entitled 'severe leash' and i didnt hear anything about a treat. I am familiar with the treat idea but other dogs i avoided this because they were not motivated by treats in public or, as in case of my Border T was prone to getting fat! Ever since i used a ball as a distraction but my present dog doesnt play with balls. I think a very tiny treat might work but we encounter dozens of dogs and that's a lot of treats so i think i need to find a willing stooge to practice this. Having had such a difficult and antisocial dog previously I thought a super sociable dog was a good thing because i had been lambasted at times for not letting him mix but he was very fear aggressive and only trusted me. I had 7 very difficult and antisocial years both for me and for him. I have no personal income at 61 no pension yet, no benefits and no job so behavourist fees would be difficult on top of the dog insurance etc which we have budgetted for. We live on my husbands pension now. I will cut up some tasty bites and ask my neighbour to stooge for me. All these dogs all so different to one another. I dont think Millie is an offlead dog but she is smashing dog in the house -no problem to us at all.
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kilmousk
post 16th Jan 2018, 12:56 am
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Sounds like you weren't watching the same video at all!
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nikirushka
post 16th Jan 2018, 9:34 am
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No indeed!

This is the one you need to have a look at:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qu55IEUnNxU...eature=youtu.be

Featuring Louie the blue whippet, in a yellow coat. "Reactivity doesn't need correcting".

Make sure you are using good treats as well. So often I have people call me for help and when I ask about food, they say 'he won't take treats when we're out' or 'he's not very foody'. And in 99% of cases, it turns out that they simply haven't been using high enough value food - often dry biscuity treats or prepackaged stuff. And I'll go for a walk with them, and they are then shocked when the dog is gobbling down the sausage bits that I've got!

What works best is usually cooked meat or sometimes cheese, cut into tiny pieces. Warm increases the value for some dogs to, so a quick spell in the microwave can help if the treats have been in the fridge. Really tempting, high value stuff.
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