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> Owners Of 3 Or More Dogs!
Pixiedog
post 25th Apr 2017, 7:07 am
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I've currently got thirteen, I have lost five over the past year.......all shapes and sizes! I do have a wonderful friend who they stay with if we go abroad and also when we go on holiday in this country she looks after the over spill. Although there are properties that will take that many dogs, to be frank it wouldn't be much of a break for us to take all of them !
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mokee
post 25th Apr 2017, 1:17 pm
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QUOTE(Craters_on_the_lawn @ 24th Apr 2017, 8:00 pm) *

I love having 3 (would love to adopt more but....). My current 3 all get along very well and are pretty easy (they are all boys so you don't necessarily need a "female in charge" as per other replies!!).


I think I should clarify that I'm not saying that every group of dogs needs to have a female in charge - just that I never realised how much work my own bitch did to keep the others in line until I didn't have her any more. Not every group of boys is going to be as troublesome as my three are - two of them are very reactive and the third is a horrible bully and they're all a little bit 'special' if you catch my drift.

But my point wasn't that everybody with boys is going to have the same problem, so I'm sorry that this is how I came across. My point was meant to be that when adopting my boys I didn't pay enough attention to their age, sex, breed and personalities - or even how well they got along together, and that this has resulted in some fairly difficult problems to overcome that I wouldn't have had to deal with if I'd been more sensible when I was adopting.

I try to make light of their issues when I post in chatter but for us adopting the wrong mix of dogs means that we now spend every day managing their interactions. This isn't a particularly pleasant way to live your life, for us or the dogs, even if it has become second nature by now. I don't want the OP to fall into the same trap, which is why I'd recommend taking their time choosing a new addition and making absolutely sure that any new dog they are considering to join the family is the best fit for the humans and the dogs before they take them home. I wish I'd done that.

Hopefully that will be a bit clearer this time. lol.gif
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EmCHammer
post 25th Apr 2017, 2:28 pm
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QUOTE
I think I should clarify that I'm not saying that every group of dogs needs to have a female in charge - just that I never realised how much work my own bitch did to keep the others in line until I didn't have her any more. Not every group of boys is going to be as troublesome as my three are - two of them are very reactive and the third is a horrible bully and they're all a little bit 'special' if you catch my drift.

But my point wasn't that everybody with boys is going to have the same problem, so I'm sorry that this is how I came across. My point was meant to be that when adopting my boys I didn't pay enough attention to their age, sex, breed and personalities - or even how well they got along together, and that this has resulted in some fairly difficult problems to overcome that I wouldn't have had to deal with if I'd been more sensible when I was adopting.

I try to make light of their issues when I post in chatter but for us adopting the wrong mix of dogs means that we now spend every day managing their interactions. This isn't a particularly pleasant way to live your life, for us or the dogs, even if it has become second nature by now. I don't want the OP to fall into the same trap, which is why I'd recommend taking their time choosing a new addition and making absolutely sure that any new dog they are considering to join the family is the best fit for the humans and the dogs before they take them home. I wish I'd done that.

Hopefully that will be a bit clearer this time. lol.gif


I understood you. Mine don't sound as hard work as yours but would thoroughly agree, mix of three dogs I had was harder work in many ways.
Even things like when wanted to do a little round the block walk couldn't do it, three did walk OK together on the lead but was much harder work. If one kicked off the others started and they could form a little pack at times.
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Craters_on_the_lawn
post 25th Apr 2017, 5:44 pm
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QUOTE(mokee @ 25th Apr 2017, 2:17 pm) *

I think I should clarify that I'm not saying that every group of dogs needs to have a female in charge - just that I never realised how much work my own bitch did to keep the others in line until I didn't have her any more. Not every group of boys is going to be as troublesome as my three are - two of them are very reactive and the third is a horrible bully and they're all a little bit 'special' if you catch my drift.

But my point wasn't that everybody with boys is going to have the same problem, so I'm sorry that this is how I came across. My point was meant to be that when adopting my boys I didn't pay enough attention to their age, sex, breed and personalities - or even how well they got along together, and that this has resulted in some fairly difficult problems to overcome that I wouldn't have had to deal with if I'd been more sensible when I was adopting.

I try to make light of their issues when I post in chatter but for us adopting the wrong mix of dogs means that we now spend every day managing their interactions. This isn't a particularly pleasant way to live your life, for us or the dogs, even if it has become second nature by now. I don't want the OP to fall into the same trap, which is why I'd recommend taking their time choosing a new addition and making absolutely sure that any new dog they are considering to join the family is the best fit for the humans and the dogs before they take them home. I wish I'd done that.

Hopefully that will be a bit clearer this time. lol.gif


Its okay I did understand what you meant too - but I was aware that for the casual reader it may not be clear - so just wanted to provide a counter-example smile.gif
(although I must admit - if I didn't live in the middle of no-where and had to do walks arround towns/cats/people/other dogs - I would definately find my 3 much more difficult!!)
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ceri1
post 26th Apr 2017, 12:35 pm
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QUOTE(EmCHammer @ 25th Apr 2017, 3:28 pm) *

I understood you. Mine don't sound as hard work as yours but would thoroughly agree, mix of three dogs I had was harder work in many ways.
Even things like when wanted to do a little round the block walk couldn't do it, three did walk OK together on the lead but was much harder work. If one kicked off the others started and they could form a little pack at times.


^ This! mine can all behave nicely with other dogs individually, but when the 3 off lead ones get together they can be dicks and bully other dogs. Even tiny Spot has learnt to join in with Ellie if she kicks off on lead, although I'm not sure she knows why she's doing it, just to support her friend...
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nikirushka
post 26th Apr 2017, 1:04 pm
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Oh yes. Take Linc and Willow to the park and they are sociable, friendly dogs, who everyone falls in love with. Take them there with Ren and they are all complete dicks because Ren kicks off at other dogs, and they dive in to protect her - Willow circles her guarding her and Linc goes on the offensive!
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NW68
post 29th Apr 2017, 11:29 am
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We're almost at 9 lol.gif stopped noticing extras after 5 lol.gif

We have a very strong top dog who is still very much in charge at 14y 6m - never ever a bad word between them. They share food/toys/beds and are good with other dogs.

This post has been edited by NW68: 29th Apr 2017, 11:31 am
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pamela joyce
post 29th Apr 2017, 5:22 pm
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I don't know if I am going to explain this properly. I had 4 bichons and now am down to 2 crying.gif All were of an age (well 16 down to 12) which in retrospect, was a big mistake. I wouldn't have changed anything and miss the 2 who have gone dreadfully, but having 4 older dogs was hard work. It wasn't a problem when they were young - all walked well, travelled well etc etc. and I didn't notice quite how hard it had got as they aged. It is so easy managing the 2.
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Ianr
post 1st May 2017, 1:53 pm
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QUOTE(kilmousk @ 24th Apr 2017, 4:31 pm) *

Thankfully the pack leader poo has been thoroughly debunked. Unfortunately there are still people that think bullying is ok but things are improving. Poor dogs that do however continue to live with those that do think its relevant or effective.


unsure.gif This seems a rather provocative and assumptive response. Where did she say that her interpretation of leading / controlling her dogs was one of bullying? They are presumably poodles that she has, you'd hardly need to bully them to control them.

I have three Gsd bitches. Ultimately in any relationship someone is always in charge so yes if push comes to shove I am in charge not them & if your own dogs are trained the same is surely true of you too?

This post has been edited by Ianr: 1st May 2017, 1:56 pm
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Ianr
post 1st May 2017, 2:05 pm
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Back to the original question however. It probably depends on the age, health & natures of your dogs. Some will be easier to mix than others - eg a dog who is (or soon likely to become) older & in failing health may not be able to keep up with a younger one who wants to be off - makes walking them together harder or more work seperately for you. 3 large dogs may be harder to control than three toy breeds, particularly if any is prone to pulling, their combined weight matches yours, & so on.
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nikirushka
post 1st May 2017, 3:36 pm
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QUOTE(Ianr @ 1st May 2017, 2:53 pm) *

unsure.gif This seems a rather provocative and assumptive response. Where did she say that her interpretation of leading / controlling her dogs was one of bullying? They are presumably poodles that she has, you'd hardly need to bully them to control them.


More a case of interpretation of language here I think - the wording that PPW used is typically used by trainers or owners who do adopt the bullying type 'pack leader' model, even if PPW does not do that herself. So for the sake opf anyone reading, it is important to point out that the whole rank reduction, dominance etc stuff has been debunked, thoroughly, repeatedly, and we should look more to owner/dog models that place the owner in more of a guide, mentor or parent role (well, all of those together) rather than as the 'alpha' role which tends to have negative connotations.
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Raqski
post 1st Jun 2017, 2:49 pm
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I like having four more than three. I have two older dogs and two younger dogs I like that I can take two out and the other two have still got each other for company.
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ceri1
post 2nd Jun 2017, 9:48 am
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That was the argument behind our number 4. Another older terrier to keep the old boy company when the younger ones go running...
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