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> First Time Dog Owners
woofgang
post 10th Apr 2017, 4:30 pm
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QUOTE(Ragsysmum @ 10th Apr 2017, 3:23 pm) *

Easiest start would be an adult dog from a foster home with a reputable rescue group.



but thatís not a breed....I was asking about breeds.
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Kanie
post 10th Apr 2017, 6:10 pm
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I'm in definite agreement that the larger guarding and livestock guardian breeds from E. Europe and Asia are not pets (at all) I know a handful of people who are genuinely prepared for what owning one of these dogs would entail would in all fairness make excellent owners, I don't believe 'a handful' makes them a viable choice and (all together now... lol.gif lol.gif lol.gif I'd much rather see them where they really belong!)

There are choices that are already 'dumbed down' in all shapes, sizes and coat types and in many ways, it's a shame we seem to want to keep reinventing the wheel here. Our own, native Mastiff is a lovely breed and a far better choice for a first time owner who wants a big, solid dog than an imported fighting or guarding breed that is still bred with that purpose at the forefront.

I's also like to see more show-type Lakeland terriers being considered by first time owners who want a terrier - rather than a Patterdale and some of the less often seen terrier breeds like Dandie Dinmont, Sealyham and Cesky are also worth considering.

I'd also recommend show-bred springers and cockers as opposed to working ones - which I would never advise a 1st-time owner to get unless he / she had been a regular beater or shooter and really knew what was entailed and was committed to putting in the work.

I do think retired greyhounds are a good choice for many people (even the Simpsons!)

So much depends on the first time owner in question though! I think my No.1 bit of advice would be not to buy a pup from an advert, but that being patient and finding a breeder or rescue that's right for them will be time well spent, no matter how frustrating it might be seeing all those cute puppy adverts rolleyes.gif

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Craters_on_the_lawn
post 10th Apr 2017, 6:15 pm
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QUOTE(maisie666 @ 10th Apr 2017, 9:54 am) *

Retired racing greyhound (with advice from the rescue kennel). Mx


A greyhound absolutely is an ideal dog for a first-time owner:

Gentle,
don't bark much,
tend to get on with other dogs,
generally prefer not to pull on the lead so very easy to train to walk-to-heel (if indeed you need to train at all!),
generally pretty calm - don't tend to get manically overexcited / jump up when people visit, or its time for a walk etc
don't demand loads of exercise,
happy to chill-out for much of the day - so tend to be easier to leave at home if you need to go out,

What's not to like?




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suzeanna
post 10th Apr 2017, 7:05 pm
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What exactly do you class as a first time owner? When my husband and I moved in together, we got a dobe pup BUT I'd been brought up with GSDs, labs etc and his parents had a variety of dogs over their lifetime. Our dobe was our first dog but we were both pretty dog savvy, even so we read up a lot about them, went to a few dobe club meetings to see how they behaved etc
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woofgang
post 10th Apr 2017, 7:26 pm
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QUOTE(suzeanna @ 10th Apr 2017, 7:05 pm) *

What exactly do you class as a first time owner? When my husband and I moved in together, we got a dobe pup BUT I'd been brought up with GSDs, labs etc and his parents had a variety of dogs over their lifetime. Our dobe was our first dog but we were both pretty dog savvy, even so we read up a lot about them, went to a few dobe club meetings to see how they behaved etc


.....well lets say someone who has either never had a dog in their life (like DH and I) or someone who has never been responsible for the raising and/or care of a dog.....so there might have been a family dog when they were a child but they were never or hardly responsible for it.


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mokee
post 11th Apr 2017, 10:06 am
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QUOTE(Craters_on_the_lawn @ 10th Apr 2017, 7:15 pm) *

A greyhound absolutely is an ideal dog for a first-time owner:

Gentle,
don't bark much,
tend to get on with other dogs,
generally prefer not to pull on the lead so very easy to train to walk-to-heel (if indeed you need to train at all!),
generally pretty calm - don't tend to get manically overexcited / jump up when people visit, or its time for a walk etc
don't demand loads of exercise,
happy to chill-out for much of the day - so tend to be easier to leave at home if you need to go out,

What's not to like?


Sorry to set the cat among the pigeons when actually I totally agree that they make fab pets, but you did specify an ex-racing greybob, and they can also be:

unreliable/dangerous with small dogs
unreliable/dangerous with small animals
require muzzling when out
unused to living in houses
not toilet trained
very big (and often clumsy) to be around small children
have sensitive stomachs

To be honest I think you can probably find reasons for any breed of dog being wrong for first time owners if you look hard enough, but personally I would suggest that they avoid working breeds including everything from working cockers to foreign herding dogs and go for something small, cute and cuddly, like a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel (just not a terrier, though... Or a Chihuahua... Or a Pekingese... Or a...).


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nikirushka
post 11th Apr 2017, 10:47 am
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I suppose we could distill it down to 'whichever breed the prospective owner has researched and established to be the best suited to their needs, temperament and lifestyle'.

Pipe dream maybe though lol.gif
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woofgang
post 11th Apr 2017, 11:49 am
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QUOTE(nikirushka @ 11th Apr 2017, 10:47 am) *

I suppose we could distill it down to 'whichever breed the prospective owner has researched and established to be the best suited to their needs, temperament and lifestyle'.

Pipe dream maybe though lol.gif


Intersting you should say this......because what started this thread....was thinking how often when talking about dogs for new owners, dog people will say.....oh but of course MY breed isnít suitable for beginners....as though all beginners are the same!
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Kanie
post 11th Apr 2017, 1:57 pm
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QUOTE(woofgang @ 11th Apr 2017, 12:49 pm) *

Intersting you should say this......because what started this thread....was thinking how often when talking about dogs for new owners, dog people will say.....oh but of course MY breed isnít suitable for beginners....as though all beginners are the same!



There are also people who have been in a breed for decades and enjoyed considerable success in the show ring and held positions on breed committees etc., but actually have very little idea about what makes 'their' breed tick.

I've come across people who say things like, "this isn't a breed that can be let off the lead / left alone more than 10 minutes / can't be trusted with other dogs ...." when what they actually mean is that they[i] have never managed it with their dogs because their priority lies elsewhere and it's easier to say 'it's the breed' than to put the time and effort into basic training.
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woofgang
post 11th Apr 2017, 2:10 pm
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yes this too I am sure.
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Ragsysmum
post 11th Apr 2017, 3:19 pm
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QUOTE(woofgang @ 10th Apr 2017, 5:30 pm) *

but thatís not a breed....I was asking about breeds.

OK, sorry. Then from experience of many foster and adopted dogs over the years, I reckon a mature, fostered greyhound is the easiest.
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