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> Training Dog To Stop Pulling On Lead
Viksfitz
post 8th Sep 2016, 6:48 pm
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Hi

I have a new dog who pulls on lead. Some of you will know about my rescue bill from other post last few days.

I have now got him a harness. He pulls with every he has but does listen when i tell him to stop and sit but as soon as we start walking again he pulls. I have tried to stop walking and make him sit when he starts to pull but it takes 10 mins to get 100 yards.

Any other advice would be appreciated

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ceri1
post 8th Sep 2016, 7:11 pm
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What kind of harness is he on? I think to stop pulling a front attaching one is best. I've been on placement with behaviourist s this week and their trainers seem to recommend the halti harness and their technique is to walk with the dog and start with a loose lead if it goes tight pause 1 second (not more to avoid frustration) then set off again. With the front attaching harness it is harder for them to pull. If not pulling give calm praise.
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ceri1
post 8th Sep 2016, 7:13 pm
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Telling him to stop and sit when he pulls isn't teaching him what you do want (you want loose lead walking, not sitting really!). Do you have treats so you can try to tempt him to walk next to you? Even one step in the right position can be rewarded with praise or treats.

This post has been edited by ceri1: 8th Sep 2016, 7:15 pm
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kilmousk
post 8th Sep 2016, 7:25 pm
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Some nice videos with Dogs Trust

Stop Pulling on the Lead
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Annieskel
post 9th Sep 2016, 9:30 am
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QUOTE(kilmousk @ 8th Sep 2016, 8:25 pm) *

Some nice videos with Dogs Trust

Stop Pulling on the Lead



All her video clips are really good.

Dogs pull for a reason, some to get to the park quicker, because they have never been taught how to walk on a loose lead at our very slow place. To a dog even our walking quickly can be slow to them. Sometimes it is because the dog isn't balanced when walking at our pace, TTouch has some very good ground work that helps a dog learn how to walk in a balanced way so they can walk at our pace on a loose lead. I have used the TTouch ground work for several dogs and they have really helped the dog. For poles I use brush handles which are quite cheap. It is fun for us and the dog while we are doing it.






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Fever
post 9th Sep 2016, 11:49 am
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Agree with the TTouch, that's a good way to work with a dog. As well as looking at why he's pulling (which is very important), you need to be consistent and not allow him to pull sometimes and not at others.
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nikirushka
post 9th Sep 2016, 3:05 pm
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I prefer to use a combination of rewarding when the dog is not pulling (gradually taking more steps between rewards) and when the dog makes the lead taut, going backwards several steps until the dog turns, then immediately continuing. I find this also removes most (if not all) frustration, because movement is not stopped, only redirected, and they soon work out that pulling gets them the opposite of what they want.

It's a lot easier to do with a front-ring harness but the rewarding is the key part of it all: make walking next to you the best place to be! With a serious puller, heavy rewarding to begin with whenever he's next to you then gradually reduce them.
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doglover08
post 17th Nov 2016, 8:52 am
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i have a lab who pull badly i have not been able to teach this but really want to do so have harness but as i only walk in woods where she is off lead i dont put it on in case she getes caught up but now would like her to walk on loose lead which she does perfectly if i have good treats but as soon as no treats she is at the end of the lead sraight away i usually get her to back to my side but she does not stay there without treats i know i am getting this wrong not her any help please
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tangojulie
post 17th Nov 2016, 10:53 am
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A practical point, if you are loose lead training it can take ages to get from A to B. If on some occasion you haven't got time for this and you can't leave the dog behind, then get an alternative style of harness/collar for the dog to wear on those occasions. That way it will be easier for him to learn that when he is wearing his normal harness, pulling doesn't work.
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Dalsmum
post 17th Nov 2016, 12:14 pm
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Start by rewarding being at your side. Make it a nice place to be. No lead just you and her

Practice in the house and the garden by calling her beside you and give a few individual treats while she is there and then release with a happy vice and maybe a quick game.

Once she is responding to that , treat her beside you then take ONE step- no more- and treat a couple of times with her at your side then release. No need for a sit, standing beside you is enough

Practice several times a day and gradually take more steps before treating until she will walk a distance.

If at any time she moves form your side go back a step or two to the number of paces she can do and spend a few more days at that level before increasing again.

When you introduce a lead keep it loose. Hold it with one finger so there is no pressure on it. The lead should be a safety net not the source of holding the dog back.

Only when you have loose lead walking in the garden should you try it elsewhere.

In the meantime , as said, find a way to manage the situation when you need to get from A to B.

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Louwra
post 17th Nov 2016, 2:16 pm
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QUOTE(Dalsmum @ 17th Nov 2016, 12:14 pm) *

Start by rewarding being at your side. Make it a nice place to be. No lead just you and her

Practice in the house and the garden by calling her beside you and give a few individual treats while she is there and then release with a happy vice and maybe a quick game.

Once she is responding to that , treat her beside you then take ONE step- no more- and treat a couple of times with her at your side then release. No need for a sit, standing beside you is enough

Practice several times a day and gradually take more steps before treating until she will walk a distance.

If at any time she moves form your side go back a step or two to the number of paces she can do and spend a few more days at that level before increasing again.

When you introduce a lead keep it loose. Hold it with one finger so there is no pressure on it. The lead should be a safety net not the source of holding the dog back.

Only when you have loose lead walking in the garden should you try it elsewhere.

In the meantime , as said, find a way to manage the situation when you need to get from A to B.


This smile.gif It takes a while, but it will work! Also worth checking out Kikopup on youtube, she is a great trainer, and has a lot of training videos on there
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doglover08
post 14th Dec 2016, 4:28 pm
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will try all this sounds good thanks
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I Love MY Cookie
post 16th Dec 2016, 11:23 am
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We have a new Pup (17 months and 26KG !!) possible cross Victorian bull dog X Staffie wub.gif and she is also pulling on the lead so this tread is helpful.

She has a lovely nature and just wants to please and be with you so hopefully progress will be made or I will just end up flat on my face lol.gif

Katherine xxx


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I Love MY Cookie
post 13th Feb 2017, 4:21 am
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No response or help ?


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nikirushka
post 13th Feb 2017, 9:06 am
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Response to what exactly? You said this thread was very helpful so I'm not sure what you mean unsure.gif
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