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> Advice - Biting / Moiuthing Staffi
phoenix21
post 29th Sep 2016, 9:18 am
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Hi

Our staffie is nearly 10 months and we have had her since 9 weeks. Ever since we have had her she has been a very mouthy / bitey dog and used to frequently draw blood when she was a pup despite doing all the usual stuff to stop her (ignoring, turning back, crating for a few minutes etc).

As she has got bigger she is definately better but when she does do it now shes very sore. She has ripped my nephews t shirt, mother in law's blouse, bitten my husband etc. My old staffie was so unlike that and its thrown me as to what to do.

Its like its just a tendancy she has. She gets lots of attention, chews, toys, walks etc.

My husband is even threatening to leave hes had enough and we have a 1 year old son so am worried she would bite him although so far she has been very very good with him.

I usually would never give up on a pet but am thinking of returning her to her breeder...i would never forgive myself if she did something to my son or nephews. In all other respects shes a good dog but i just dont know how else to combat this. She is well socialised and goes to dog training once a fortnight. Oh and shes spayed too.

Any other advice at all???? i am thinking of a trainer but its £75 for 2 hours so quite expensive...
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Dalsmum
post 29th Sep 2016, 9:59 am
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Some information on the situations when she bites might help.

Is she playing, excited, frustrated, is it when someone comes in, is it out of the blue?

Do you see any body signals beforehand - body tensing, ears flattening, barking or growling?
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woofgang
post 29th Sep 2016, 10:01 am
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You donít need a trainer, you need a behaviourist to get to the root of why she is doing this....and yes it will be expensive.
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Elainew
post 29th Sep 2016, 10:47 am
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Exactly what Woofgang says! You need a professional behaviourist to visit you and observe her.
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ceri1
post 29th Sep 2016, 10:56 am
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Someone registered with the APBC, not just a random internet trainer who could do more harm than good. Remember, you might pay £100 now (and first visits usually include free phone/email back up for some time afterwards), but that's to allow you to keep your dog for the rest of her life. Cheaper than a new puppy...
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phoenix21
post 29th Sep 2016, 12:40 pm
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Thanks shes not nasty in any way. Its for attention (for example when am going round the garden on the poo run she will nip at the back of my legs) then when she is sitting on the sofa with me at night she will chew my hands, sleeves etc even though she has her own toys. She doesnt seem to understand when she hurts -like she has no bite inhibitor. even though ive tried to instill this since she was a little pup and shes had plenty of socialisation / puppy classes etc.

Also, she knows the weaker person if you know what i mean. so the nephews and my mother in law who will wave her arms around etc trying to get her away which doesnt help. She will continuously jump at them and bite / pull clothes as to visitors in the house but when on a walk she doesnt jump up at people and is fine off the lead.


I wouldnt just go out and get another puppy its her or nothing. I dont want to give her up at all but my husband is at his wits end and am getting really stressed as he takes it all out on me. He hates me defending her all the time. Yes i know its not expensive on the grand scheme of things but trying to get my husband to see this when he is intent on giving her up is another matter. I will look up a few behavorists in our area and see what i can do.

Thanks for advice so far.

This post has been edited by phoenix21: 29th Sep 2016, 12:42 pm
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ceri1
post 29th Sep 2016, 1:01 pm
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The thing about a behaviourist is they can help get everyone on board. She will sense the tension in the family which will make her worse. Your arm waving relatives also need training!
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phoenix21
post 29th Sep 2016, 1:05 pm
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QUOTE(ceri1 @ 29th Sep 2016, 2:01 pm) *

The thing about a behaviourist is they can help get everyone on board. She will sense the tension in the family which will make her worse. Your arm waving relatives also need training!


I totally agree! Its hard because she goes to the in laws a couple of days a week when we are at work. She is the softest dog with my father in law but just knows she can get away with being naughty to my mother in law. ah happy families! I've contacted a lady listed on the APBC and was actually thinking it might be claimable through insurance too...
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ceri1
post 29th Sep 2016, 3:43 pm
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It might be claimable on the insurance. If it's someone who needs a vet referral. Worth asking the insurance...
If you get the behaviourist visit, try to make sure your MIL and OH can be there so they get the help first hand as well smile.gif
PS I'm sure we'd like a picture of your naughty pup...

This post has been edited by ceri1: 29th Sep 2016, 3:45 pm
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kilmousk
post 29th Sep 2016, 4:04 pm
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APBC behaviourists should require a vet referral form to be completed before coming out as its part of their membership criteria. Most insurances woudl refuse payment if not done but its also essentiial that health is assessed first.

You say you have done "all the usual stuff to stop her (ignoring, turning back, crating for a few minutes etc)." but have you actually taught her what you do want?

Om the interim I would be redirecting her onto something appropriate to chew or bite, whether its a ragger, rubber, soft or squeaky toy and making this really axciting and fun for her. I would also be heavily rewarding incompatible behaviours such as sitting and basic obedience moves so she is getting lots of positive interactions and guidance.

Its also worth remembering that between 6-10 months is when their adult teeth are still setting in their jaw and a time where they are very keen to bite and chew so a normal developmental phase.
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Annieskel
post 29th Sep 2016, 9:13 pm
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QUOTE(phoenix21 @ 29th Sep 2016, 10:18 am) *

Hi

Our staffie is nearly 10 months and we have had her since 9 weeks. Ever since we have had her she has been a very mouthy / bitey dog and used to frequently draw blood when she was a pup despite doing all the usual stuff to stop her (ignoring, turning back, crating for a few minutes etc).



I have never known them to work with a biting puppy, what has always worked for me is to walk out of the room, close the door and count to 10 then walk in again, each time the biting starts I walk out. It doesn't take long for a dog to realise that when she bites she I left on her own. Leaving it longer than the count to 10 means your dog won't know why she has been left on her own and it won't work, dogs don't remember things like this for more than a very very short time. Cyril, my Staffie was 2 years old when he came, he was like this but not know and that is how I stopped him.

QUOTE

I totally agree! Its hard because she goes to the in laws a couple of days a week when we are at work. She is the softest dog with my father in law but just knows she can get away with being naughty to my mother in law. ah happy families! I've contacted a lady listed on the APBC and was actually thinking it might be claimable through insurance too...


Get your MIL to walk out of the room and count to 10 as well, then go back in again. She does need to chew so give her chewing toys though being a Staffie they may not last very long, Cyril's don't. lol.gif



This post has been edited by Annieskel: 29th Sep 2016, 9:18 pm


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Fever
post 30th Sep 2016, 11:02 am
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I agree that you need a qualified behaviourist. Certainly health needs looking at as a possible cause. I would not look at any form of training until you gave established possible causes and that can only be done through observation by someone who is experienced and qualified.

I'd also say, with the greatest respect and understanding, that the problem has been going on for a long time before you have sought professional help - so don't give up now, just as you are about to get the help you needed 6 months ago! You might be pleasantly surprised at just how much a good behaviourist can do in a relatively short space of time - but even if it takes 12 months, your dog has at least another 12-14 years to enjoy.

Good luck!
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Annieskel
post 30th Sep 2016, 8:40 pm
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Walking out of the room when your dog bites is not training, it is putting your dog in a position were he works out why you walk out of the room. Not everyone has the money to get in a behaviourist and need something they can do that will stop the dog's behaviour without causing any problems or using force. It is easy to do, isn't stressful to you and does work.

There is a behaviourist not far from me, she is registered as one and is old fashioned in her methods, I found out because someone on the internet had her out and I was shocked at what she was telling this owner to do so looked into her up. If you do get a behaviourist, please try and go by recommendation of someone who has had them as well as the list they are registered on.


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phoenix21
post 1st Oct 2016, 5:23 am
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QUOTE(Fever @ 30th Sep 2016, 12:02 pm) *

I agree that you need a qualified behaviourist. Certainly health needs looking at as a possible cause. I would not look at any form of training until you gave established possible causes and that can only be done through observation by someone who is experienced and qualified.

I'd also say, with the greatest respect and understanding, that the problem has been going on for a long time before you have sought professional help - so don't give up now, just as you are about to get the help you needed 6 months ago! You might be pleasantly surprised at just how much a good behaviourist can do in a relatively short space of time - but even if it takes 12 months, your dog has at least another 12-14 years to enjoy.

Good luck!


Erm she's a puppy and yes I did ask advice at the vets and took her to training etc like they recommended and other methods and did what people recommended that I do. Everyone has said she will grow out of it.

Thanks for the advice. I think as someone said I was playing with her on the sofa last night with her toy instead of leaving her to play on her own and that certainly helped. My husband also said you know she's not going anywhere...really!! Why dI'd you cause me all this stress saying she had to go then...men!!!

She's such a good dog in some ways and her recall unlike my last staffie at her age is really good. Think it's all about reinforcing things properly and probably the main thing is getting other people like my husband to go through with it too....now....how to solve cat chasing ha!!

This is the wee minx (if I can work out how to post a pic lol)
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phoenix21
post 1st Oct 2016, 5:35 am
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